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Trust, reciprocity and favors in cooperative relationships

  • Atila Abdulkadiroglu

    ()

    (Duke University - Department of Economics)

  • Kyle Bagwell

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Columbia University)

We study trust, reciprocity and favors in a repeated trust game with private information. In our main analysis, players are willing to exhibit trust and thereby facilitate cooperative gains only if such behavior is regarded as a favor that must be reciprocated, either immediately or in the future. Private information is a fundamental ingredient in our theory. A player with the ability to provide a favor must have the incentive to reveal this capability, and this incentive is provided by an equilibrium construction in which favors are reciprocated. We also offer the novel prediction that the size of a favor owed may decline over time, as netural phases of the relationship are experienced. Indeed, a favor-exchange relationship with this feature offers a higher total payoff than does a simple favor-exchange relationship. We also describe specific circumstances in which a relationship founded on favor exchange may be inferior to a relationship in which an infrequent and symmetric punishment motivates cooperative behavior. Finally, we show that a hybrid relationship, in which players begin with a honeymoon period and then either proceed to a favor-exchange relationship of suffer a symmetric punishment, can also offer scope for improvement.

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File URL: http://www.econ.columbia.edu/RePEc/pdf/DP0405-22.pdf
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Paper provided by Columbia University, Department of Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 0405-22.

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Length: 59 pages
Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:clu:wpaper:0405-22
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  1. Hopenhayn, Hugo A. & Skrzypacz, Andrzej, 2001. "Tacit Collusion in Repeated Auctions," Research Papers 1698r2, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  2. Aoyagi, Masaki, 2003. "Bid rotation and collusion in repeated auctions," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 79-105, September.
  3. Ernst Fehr & Simon G�chter, 2000. "Fairness and Retaliation: The Economics of Reciprocity," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 159-181, Summer.
  4. Engle-Warnick, J. & Slonim, Robert L., 2006. "Learning to trust in indefinitely repeated games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 95-114, January.
  5. Wang, Cheng, 1995. "Dynamic Insurance with Private Information and Balanced Budgets," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 577-95, October.
  6. Athey, Susan & Bagwell, Kyle, 2001. "Optimal Collusion with Private Information," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 32(3), pages 428-65, Autumn.
  7. Watson, Joel, 1999. "Starting Small and Renegotiation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 52-90, March.
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