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Why is there Cross-Country Variation in Female Labor Force Participation Rates? The Role of Male Attitudes Toward Family and Sex Roles

Author

Listed:
  • Heather Antecol

    (Claremont McKenna College)

Abstract

Antecol (2000) finds that culture plays a role in explaining inter-ethnic variation in the gender gap in labor force participation rates (LFPR). However, Antecol (2000) was unable to determine what the components of culture, such as differences in preferences regarding family structure and women's role in market versus home work, actually are and how to quantify these components in an empirically meaningful manner. Using data from the 1994 International Social Survey Programme (ISSP), this paper proxies culture using a set of questions on male attitudes toward family and sex roles. I find that women are more likely to work if men in their country view female LFP in a favorable light.

Suggested Citation

  • Heather Antecol, 2003. "Why is there Cross-Country Variation in Female Labor Force Participation Rates? The Role of Male Attitudes Toward Family and Sex Roles," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2003-03, Claremont Colleges.
  • Handle: RePEc:clm:clmeco:2003-03
    as

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    File URL: http://www.claremontmckenna.edu/rdschool/papers/2003-03.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Christoph M. Schmidt, 2000. "Interindustry and Interregion Differentials: Mechanics and Interpretation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(3), pages 516-521, August.
    2. Krueger, Alan B & Summers, Lawrence H, 1988. "Efficiency Wages and the Inter-industry Wage Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(2), pages 259-293, March.
    3. James W. Albrecht & Per-Anders Edin & Susan B. Vroman, 2000. "A Cross-country Comparison of Attitudes Towards Mothers Working and their Actual Labor Market Experience," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 14(4), pages 591-607, December.
    4. Danièle Meulders & Robert Plasman & Valérie Vander Stricht, 1993. "Position of women on the labour market in the European Community," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/13466, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Antecol, Heather, 2000. "An examination of cross-country differences in the gender gap in labor force participation rates," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 409-426, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Guido Heineck, 2007. "Religion, attitudes towards working mothers and women’s labor market participation: Evidence for Germany, Ireland, and the UK," Papers on Economics of Religion 07/03, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    2. Tiago Cavalcanti & José Tavares, 2016. "The Output Cost of Gender Discrimination: A Model‐based Macroeconomics Estimate," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(590), pages 109-134, February.
    3. repec:oup:wbecrv:v:31:y:2017:i:3:p:747-766. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Dante Contreras & Paulina Sepúlveda, 2017. "Effect of Lengthening the School Day on Mother's Labor Supply," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(3), pages 747-766.
    5. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:29:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1057_s41287-016-0013-z is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Jungmin Lee, 2007. "Marriage, the Sharing Rule, and Pocket Money: The Case of South Korea," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55, pages 557-581.
    7. Marcela Perticara, 2006. "Women’s Employment Transitions and Fertility," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv172, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Family Structure; Female Labor Force Participation; Social Norms; Culture;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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