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The Decision to Work by Married Immigrant Women: The Role of Extended Family Households

Author

Listed:
  • Heather Antecol

    (Claremont McKenna College)

  • Kelly Bedard

    (UC - Santa Barbara)

Abstract

We find differential rates of cohabitation with adult relatives as well as differential impacts of that cohabitation on the probability of employment for married female immigrants across regions of origin. This suggests that traditions and/or cultural determinants of family structure influence female labor force participation. Not surprisingly, we also find that the labor supply response is biggest for immigrants with young children. This further suggests that cohabitation allows married immigrant women to share childcare and other household responsibilities, which in turn increases the probability that they work outside of the home.

Suggested Citation

  • Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2002. "The Decision to Work by Married Immigrant Women: The Role of Extended Family Households," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2002-34, Claremont Colleges.
  • Handle: RePEc:clm:clmeco:2002-34
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    File URL: http://www.claremontmckenna.edu/rdschool/papers/2002-34.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. Anne Hill, 1984. "Female Labor Force Participation in Japan: An Aggregate Model," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(2), pages 280-287.
    2. Xiaodong Gong & Arthur van Soest, 2002. "Family Structure and Female Labor Supply in Mexico City," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(1), pages 163-191.
    3. Patricia M. Anderson & Philip B. Levine, 1999. "Child Care and Mothers' Employment Decisions," NBER Working Papers 7058, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Shimada, Haruo & Higuchi, Yoshio, 1985. "An Analysis of Trends in Female Labor Force Participation in Japan," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 355-374, January.
    5. Blau, David M & Robins, Philip K, 1988. "Child-Care Costs and Family Labor Supply," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(3), pages 374-381, August.
    6. repec:rus:hseeco:9882 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Reimers, Cordelia W, 1985. "Cultural Differences in Labor Force Participation among Married Women," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 251-255, May.
    8. M. Anne Hill, 1989. "Female Labor Supply in Japan: Implications of the Informal Sector for Labor Force Participation and Hours of Work," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(1), pages 143-161.
    9. Ogawa, Naohiro & Ermisch, John F, 1996. "Family Structure, Home Time Demands, and the Employment Patterns of Japanese Married Women," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(4), pages 677-702, October.
    10. Lisa M. Powell, 2002. "Joint Labor Supply and Childcare Choice Decisions of Married Mothers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(1), pages 106-128.
    11. Marta Tienda & Jennifer Glass, 1985. "Household structure and labor force participation of black, hispanic, and white mothers," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(3), pages 381-394, August.
    12. Harriet Orcutt Duleep & Seth Sanders, 1993. "The Decision to Work by Married Immigrant Women," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(4), pages 677-690, July.
    13. David C. Ribar, 1992. "Child Care and the Labor Supply of Married Women: Reduced Form Evidence," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(1), pages 134-165.
    14. Antecol, Heather, 2000. "An examination of cross-country differences in the gender gap in labor force participation rates," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 409-426, July.
    15. Connelly, Rachel, 1992. "The Effect of Child Care Costs on Married Women's Labor Force Participation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(1), pages 83-90, February.
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    17. Tadashi Yamada & Tetsuji Yamada & Frank Chaloupka, 1987. "Using Aggregate Data to Estimate the Part-Time and Full-Time Work Behavior of Japanese Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(4), pages 574-583.
    18. Masaru Sasaki, 2002. "The Causal Effect of Family Structure on Labor Force Participation among Japanese Married Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(2), pages 429-440.
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    Cited by:

    1. Boudarbat, Brahim & Gontero, Sonia Ines, 2008. "Offre de travail des femmes mariées immigrantes au Canada," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 84(2), pages 129-153, juin.
    2. Marcela Perticara & Claudia Sanhueza, 2010. "Women’s Employment after Childbirth," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv258, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
    3. Marcela Perticara, 2006. "Women’s Employment Transitions and Fertility," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv172, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Family Structure; Female Labor Force Participation; Immigration;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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