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Factor Price Risk and the Diffusion of Conservation Technology: Evidence from the Water Industry

Author

Listed:
  • Georgina Moreno

    (Scripps College)

  • David Sunding

    (UC - Berkeley)

Abstract

The paper examines the influence of factor price risk on factor-use efficiency through the adoption of conservation technology. The effect of a mean-preserving increase in factor price risk on optimal input-use efficiency is shown to be conditional on the own-price elasticity of factor use evaluated at the initial equilibrium. The conceptual analysis indicates that that there may be a discrepancy between the aggregate and firm-level effects of price risk on efficiency. Theoretical results are tested and confirmed using a unique data set from the water industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Georgina Moreno & David Sunding, 2001. "Factor Price Risk and the Diffusion of Conservation Technology: Evidence from the Water Industry," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2001-36, Claremont Colleges.
  • Handle: RePEc:clm:clmeco:2001-36
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    File URL: http://www.claremontmckenna.edu/rdschool/papers/2001-36.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stavins, Robert & Jaffe, Adam & Newell, Richard, 2000. "Technological Change and the Environment," Working Paper Series rwp00-002, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
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    8. Jaffe, Adam B. & Stavins, Robert N., 1994. "The energy paradox and the diffusion of conservation technology," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 91-122, May.
    9. Sunding, David & Zilberman, David, 2001. "The agricultural innovation process: Research and technology adoption in a changing agricultural sector," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 207-261 Elsevier.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    technology adoption; risk; conservation; water resources; ordered probit;

    JEL classification:

    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

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