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Childhood Housing and Adult Earnings: A Between-Siblings Analysis of Housing Vouchers and Public Housing

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Listed:
  • Fredrik Andersson
  • John C. Haltiwanger
  • Mark J. Kutzbach
  • Giordano Palloni
  • Henry O. Pollakowski
  • Daniel H. Weinberg

Abstract

To date, research on the long-term effects of childhood participation in voucher-assisted and public housing has been limited by the lack of data and suitable identification strategies. We create a national level longitudinal data set that enables us to analyze how children’s housing experiences affect adult earnings and incarceration rates. While naive estimates suggest there are substantial negative consequences to childhood participation in voucher assisted and public housing, this result appears to be driven largely by selection of households into housing assistance programs. To mitigate this source of bias, we employ household fixed-effects specifications that use only within-household (across-sibling) variation for identification. Compared to naive specifications, household fixed-effects estimates for earnings are universally more positive, and they suggest that there are positive and statistically significant benefits from childhood residence in assisted housing on young adult earnings for nearly all demographic groups. Childhood participation in assisted housing also reduces the likelihood of incarceration across all household race/ethnicity groups. Time spent in voucher-assisted or public housing is especially beneficial for females from non-Hispanic Black households, who experience substantial increases in expected earnings and lower incarceration rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Fredrik Andersson & John C. Haltiwanger & Mark J. Kutzbach & Giordano Palloni & Henry O. Pollakowski & Daniel H. Weinberg, 2013. "Childhood Housing and Adult Earnings: A Between-Siblings Analysis of Housing Vouchers and Public Housing," Working Papers 13-48rr, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:13-48rr
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:taf:houspd:v:27:y:2017:i:2:p:266-281 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Raj Chetty & Nathaniel Hendren, 2016. "The Impacts of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility I: Childhood Exposure Effects," NBER Working Papers 23001, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Sandler, Danielle H., 2017. "Externalities of public housing: The effect of public housing demolitions on local crime," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 24-35.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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