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Using Government Documents To Assess The Influence Of Academic Research On Macroeconomic Policy


  • Joaquim Silvestre
  • Thomas Mayer

    (Department of Economics, University of California Davis)


How can one tell whether academic research influences macroeconomic policy? One possibility is to look at government documents that set forth macro policy. This paper looks for such traces in U.S., European and Japanese documents. Because of ease of access it focuses on U.S. documents. Numerous traces of academic research can be found. But the road from government documents to policy is a precarious one; references and allusions to academic literature may merely be rationalizations for policies adopted for other reasons. Similarly, governments may use the results of academic research without this showing up in government documents.

Suggested Citation

  • Joaquim Silvestre & Thomas Mayer, 2003. "Using Government Documents To Assess The Influence Of Academic Research On Macroeconomic Policy," Working Papers 994, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cda:wpaper:99-4

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Blau, David M, 1998. "Labor Force Dynamics of Older Married Couples," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(3), pages 595-629, July.
    2. Jonathan Gruber, 1999. "Social Security and Retirement in Canada," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security and Retirement around the World, pages 73-99 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Michael D. Hurd, 1990. "The Joint Retirement Decision of Husbands and Wives," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Aging, pages 231-258 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Pozzebon, Silvana & Mitchell, Olivia S, 1989. "Married Women's Retirement Behavior," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 2(1), pages 39-53.
    5. Baker, Michael & Benjamin, Dwayne, 1999. "How do retirement tests affect the labour supply of older men?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 27-51, January.
    6. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    7. Baker, Michael & Benjamin, Dwayne, 1999. "Early Retirement Provisions and the Labor Force Behavior of Older Men: Evidence from Canada," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 724-756, October.
    8. Blau, David M., 1997. "Social security and the labor supply of older married couples," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 373-418, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Masazumi Wakatabe, 2013. "Central Banking, Japanese Style: Economics and the Bank of Japan, 1945-1985," HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT AND POLICY, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2013(1), pages 141-160.
    2. Jose Ripoll, 2003. "National Appointments to Multinational Monetary Policy Making: A Role Conflict?," Macroeconomics 0301009, EconWPA.

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