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Putting Things In Order: Patterns Of Trade Dynamics And Growth


  • Robert Feenstra
  • Andrew K. Rose
  • Pierpaolo Battigalli

    (Department of Economics, University of California Davis)


We develop a procedure to rank-order countries and commodities using dis-aggregated American imports data. We find strong evidence that both countries and commodities can be ranked, consistent with the ""produce cycle"" hypothesis. Countries habitually begin to export goods to the United States according to an ordering; goods are also exported in order. We estimate these orderings using a semi-parametric methodology which takes account of the fact that most goods are not exported by most countries in our sample. Our orderings seem sensible, robust and intuitive. For instance, our country rankings derived from dis-aggregated trade data, turn out to be highly correlated with macroeconomic phenomenon such as national productivity levels and growth rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Feenstra & Andrew K. Rose & Pierpaolo Battigalli, 2003. "Putting Things In Order: Patterns Of Trade Dynamics And Growth," Working Papers 9714, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cda:wpaper:97-14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, "undated". "The Productivity of Nations," Working Papers 96012, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
    2. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
    3. Jeffrey A. Frankel & David Romer, 1996. "Trade and Growth: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 5476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ramkishen S. Rajan & Rahul Sen & Reza Y. Siregar, 2002. "Hong Kong, Singapore and the East Asian Crisis: How Important were Trade Spillovers?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(4), pages 503-537, April.
    2. Deborah L. Swenson, 2008. "Multinationals and the creation of Chinese trade linkages," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(2), pages 596-618, May.
    3. Puga, Diego & Trefler, Daniel, 2010. "Wake up and smell the ginseng: International trade and the rise of incremental innovation in low-wage countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 64-76, January.
    4. Miguel Lebre de Freitas & Ricardo Paes Mamede, 2008. "Structural Transformation and the role of Foreign Direct Investment in Portugal: a descriptive analysis for the period 1990-2005," GEE Papers 0009, Gabinete de Estratégia e Estudos, Ministério da Economia, revised Dec 2008.
    5. Michele Di Maio & Federico Tamagni, 2008. "The Evolution of World Export Sophistication and the Italian Trade Anomaly," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(1), pages 135-174, January-F.
    6. Brenton, Paul & Newfarmer, Richard & Walkenhorst, Peter, 2009. "Avenues for Export Diversification: Issues for Low-Income Countries," MPRA Paper 22758, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. MALEK MANSOUR Joffrey, "undated". "Trade Openness and Growth: Does Sector Specialization Matter?," EcoMod2003 330700093, EcoMod.
    8. Isabelle Bensidoun & Guillaume Gaulier & Deniz Ünal-Kesenci, 2001. "The Nature of Specialization Matters for Growth: an Empirical Investigation," Working Papers 2001-13, CEPII research center.
    9. Patricio Meller & Gabriela Contreras, 2002. "La competitividad de las exportaciones chinas en los mercados de Estados Unidos y Japón," Documentos de Trabajo 152, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    10. Luca De Benedictis & Lucia Tajoli, 2005. "Similarity in export composition and catching-up," Working Papers 28-2005, Macerata University, Department of Finance and Economic Sciences, revised Oct 2008.

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    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General


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