IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cda/wpaper/01-9.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Timing of Product Innovation and Regulatory Delay

Author

Listed:
  • James E. Prieger

    (Department of Economics, University of California Davis)

Abstract

This paper endogenizes the interplay between innovation by a regulated â?¦rm and regulatory delay. In the signaling model, the â?¦rm times its innovation to communicate its private information about the MC of delay to the regulator. When product innovation costs fall over time, an extra day of regulatory delay increases time to introduction by more than a day. Successful signaling leads the regulator to adjust regulatory delay. The separating equilibrium of the signaling model generates testable predictions for how innovation and regulatory delay evolve over time. The model is consistent with data gathered from one of the Bell telecommunications â?¦rms.

Suggested Citation

  • James E. Prieger, 2003. "The Timing of Product Innovation and Regulatory Delay," Working Papers 19, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cda:wpaper:01-9
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://wp.econ.ucdavis.edu/01-9.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James E. Prieger, 2002. "Regulation, Innovation, and the Introduction of New Telecommunications Services," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(4), pages 704-715, November.
    2. Roycroft, Trevor R., 1999. "Alternative regulation and the efficiency of local exchange carriers: evidence from the Ameritech states," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 469-480, September.
    3. Vuong, Quang H, 1989. "Likelihood Ratio Tests for Model Selection and Non-nested Hypotheses," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 307-333, March.
    4. Yossef Spiegel & Daniel F. Spulber, 1997. "Capital Structure with Countervailing Incentives," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 28(1), pages 1-24, Spring.
    5. Prager, Robin A, 1989. "The Effects of Regulatory Policies on the Cost of Debt for Electric Utilities: An Empirical Investigation," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(1), pages 33-53, January.
    6. In-Koo Cho & David M. Kreps, 1987. "Signaling Games and Stable Equilibria," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 102(2), pages 179-221.
    7. Cabral, Luis M B & Riordan, Michael H, 1989. "Incentives for Cost Reduction under Price Cap Regulation," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 93-102, June.
    8. Yossef Spiegel & Simon Wilkie, 1996. "Investment in a New Technology as a Signal of Firm Value Under Regulatory Opportunism," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(2), pages 251-276, June.
    9. Wolak, Frank A, 1991. "The Local Nature of Hypothesis Tests Involving Inequality Constraints in Nonlinear Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(4), pages 981-995, July.
    10. Lyon, Thomas P & Huang, Haizou, 1995. "Asymmetric Regulation and Incentives for Innovation," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 769-776.
    11. Donald, Stephen G & Sappington, David E M, 1997. "Choosing among Regulatory Options in the United States Telecommunications Industry," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 227-243, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Heli Koski & Tobias Kretschmer, 2004. "Entry, Standards and Competition: Firm Strategies and the Diffusion of Mobile Telephony," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 26(1), pages 89-113, November.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cda:wpaper:01-9. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Scott Dyer). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/educdus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.