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Improving Communication in Economics: A Task for Methodologists

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  • Thomas Mayer

    (Department of Economics, University of California Davis)

Abstract

Economists do not communicate efficiently and methodologists should expand their bailiwick to deal with this and with similar practical problems. Both the quality of and the professional prestige associated with popular writing should be enhanced. Academic economists need to pay more attention to communicating with economists in business and government. Within academic economics information flooding is a serious problem. Several ways of ameliorating this problem exist.

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  • Thomas Mayer, 2003. "Improving Communication in Economics: A Task for Methodologists," Working Papers 06, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cda:wpaper:00-6
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    File URL: http://wp.econ.ucdavis.edu/00-6.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Boldyrev, I., 2011. "Economic Methodology Today: a Review of Major Contributions," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, issue 9, pages 47-70.
    2. Wicks, Rick, 2011. "Assumption without representation: the unacknowledged abstraction from communities and social goods," MPRA Paper 51674, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Schiffman, Daniel A., 2004. "Mainstream economics, heterodoxy and academic exclusion: a review essay," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 1079-1095, November.
    4. Klaus Mohn, 2010. "Autism in Economics? A Second Opinion," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 39(2), pages 191-208, July.

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