IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Economic Possibilities for the Grandchildern of John Maynard Keynes

  • Peter Funk

This paper explores the impact of insatiable needs on the sustainability and the direction of technological change and economic growth. In a simple framework it is shown that growth can only be sustained if either the opportunity costs of research are small at low levels of research or if some needs are insatiable. The first source of sustained growth (low opportunity cost of research) also enhances an efficient spread of growth over different technologies and commodities, while the second (insatiable needs) typically induces the `wrong kind' of growth. In connexion with Keynes' essay `On the Economic Possibilities of our Grandchildren' [1931], we consider relative needs as the main source of insatiability of needs.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.wiwi.uni-bonn.de/bgsepapers/bonsfa/bonsfa512.ps
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Bonn, Germany in its series Discussion Paper Serie A with number 512.

as
in new window

Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Jul 1994
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bon:bonsfa:512
Contact details of provider: Postal: Bonn Graduate School of Economics, University of Bonn, Adenauerallee 24 - 26, 53113 Bonn, Germany
Fax: +49 228 73 6884
Web page: http://www.bgse.uni-bonn.de

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 1990. "A Model of Growth Through Creative Destruction," NBER Working Papers 3223, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Duranton, Gilles, 2001. "Endogenous labor supply, growth and overlapping generations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 295-314, March.
  3. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth Through Creative Destruction," Scholarly Articles 12490578, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Funk,Peter, 1993. "The direction of technological change," Discussion Paper Serie A 393, University of Bonn, Germany.
  5. Funk,Peter, 1991. "Bertrand and Walras euilibria in large economies," Discussion Paper Serie A 348, University of Bonn, Germany.
  6. Paul Romer, 1989. "Endogenous Technological Change," NBER Working Papers 3210, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Giacomo Corneo & Olivier Jeanne, 1994. "Conspicuous Consumption and the Existence of Upward Sloping Demand Curves," Discussion Paper Serie A 461, University of Bonn, Germany.
  8. Bagwell, Laurie Simon & Bernheim, B Douglas, 1996. "Veblen Effects in a Theory of Conspicuous Consumption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 349-73, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bon:bonsfa:512. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (BGSE Office)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.