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Forward Looking Behavior And Empirical Household Consumption Function

  • Insong Jang

Modern consumer theories are built upon the premise of the forward looking behavior of households. While most of the empirical studies at micro level are based on Euler equation, there have been few to estimate the household consumption function and test the implication of forward looking behavior directly. One of the main difficulties is that forward looking behavior involves such variables as human wealth and income uncertainty which are not directly observable. This paper exploits the rotating panel feature of Consumer Expenditure Survey to construct the proxies and test significance of them in the household consumption function. We fail to find evidence to support forward looking behavior over long horizon.

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File URL: http://www.wiwi.uni-bonn.de/bgsepapers/bonedp/bgse7_2001.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Bonn, Germany in its series Bonn Econ Discussion Papers with number bgse7_2001.

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Length: 38
Date of creation: Jan 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bon:bonedp:bgse7_2001
Contact details of provider: Postal: Bonn Graduate School of Economics, University of Bonn, Adenauerallee 24 - 26, 53113 Bonn, Germany
Fax: +49 228 73 6884
Web page: http://www.bgse.uni-bonn.de

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  1. Pemberton, James, 1993. "Attainable Non-optimality or Unattainable Optimality: A New Approach to Stochastic Life Cycle Problems," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(416), pages 1-20, January.
  2. Hall, Robert E, 1978. "Stochastic Implications of the Life Cycle-Permanent Income Hypothesis: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(6), pages 971-87, December.
  3. Christopher D Carroll, 1997. "Death to the Log-Linearized Consumption euler Equation! (And Very Poor Health to the Second-Order Approximation)," Economics Working Paper Archive 390, The Johns Hopkins University,Department of Economics.
  4. Jonathan S. Skinner, 1987. "Risky Income, Life Cycle Consumption, and Precautionary Savings," NBER Working Papers 2336, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Hildenbrand, W. & Kneip, A., 1999. "Demand aggregation under structural stability," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 81-109, February.
  6. Christopher D. Carroll, 1992. "How does future income affect current consumption?," Working Paper Series / Economic Activity Section 126, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  7. Miles, David, 1997. "A Household Level Study of the Determinants of Incomes and Consumption," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 1-25, January.
  8. Spanos, Aris, 1989. "Early Empirical Findings on the Consumption Function, Stylized Facts or Fiction: A Retrospective View," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(1), pages 150-69, January.
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