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Central bank institutional structure and effective central banking : cross-country empirical evidence

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  • Hasan, Iftekhar
  • Mester, Loretta J.

Abstract

Over the last decade, the legal and institutional frameworks governing central banks and financial market regulatory authorities throughout the world have undergone significant changes. This has created new interest in better understanding the roles played by organizational structures, accountability and transparency in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of central banks in achieving their objectives and ultimately yielding better economic outcomes. Although much has been written pointing out the potential role institutional form can play in central bank performance, little empirical work has been done to investigate the hypothesis that institutional form is related to performance. This paper attempts to help fill this void

Suggested Citation

  • Hasan, Iftekhar & Mester, Loretta J., 2008. "Central bank institutional structure and effective central banking : cross-country empirical evidence," Research Discussion Papers 29/2008, Bank of Finland.
  • Handle: RePEc:bof:bofrdp:2008_029
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anne Sibert, 2003. "Monetary Policy Committees: Individual and Collective Reputations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(3), pages 649-665.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yiwei Fang & Iftekhar Hasan & Loretta J. Mester, 2011. "Institutional Structure and Effectiveness of Central Banks during the Financial Crisis: An Empirical Analysis," Chapters,in: Handbook of Central Banking, Financial Regulation and Supervision, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Etienne Farvaque & Hakim Hammadou & Piotr Stanek, 2011. "Selecting Your Inflation Targeters: Background and Performance of Monetary Policy Committee Members," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(2), pages 223-238, May.
    3. Etienne Farvaque & Piotr Stanek & Stéphane Vigeant, 2014. "On the Performance of Monetary Policy Committees," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(2), pages 177-203, May.
    4. Lyonnet, Victor & Werner, Richard, 2012. "Lessons from the Bank of England on ‘quantitative easing’ and other ‘unconventional’ monetary policies," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 94-105.
    5. Michael Koetter & Kasper Roszbach & Giancarlo Spagnolo, 2014. "Financial Stability and Central Bank Governance," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(4), pages 31-68, December.
    6. Rajeev Goel & Iftekhar Hasan, 2011. "Economy-wide corruption and bad loans in banking: international evidence," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(7), pages 455-461.
    7. repec:eee:finsta:v:40:y:2019:i:c:p:110-131 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Levieuge, G. & Lucotte, Y. & Pradines-Jobet, F., 2019. "Central banks’ preferences and banking sector vulnerability," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 110-131.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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