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Fiat exchange in finite economies

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  • Kovenock, Dan
  • Vries, Casper G. de

Abstract

The state of the art of rendering fiat money valuable is either to impose a boundary condition, or to make the boundary condition unimportant by using infinities concerning the sequence of markets and/or the number of agents, so as to circumvent backward induction.We present two models of fiat exchange in deliberately finite economies in which the usage is not imposed.In the first approach agents have incomplete information about their relative position in the trade cycle.The second approach relies on the possibility that multiple non-monetary equilibria of the one-shot game can support monetary equilibria in the repeated game.

Suggested Citation

  • Kovenock, Dan & Vries, Casper G. de, 1995. "Fiat exchange in finite economies," Research Discussion Papers 23/1995, Bank of Finland.
  • Handle: RePEc:bof:bofrdp:1995_023
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. D'Artis Kancs & Pavel Ciaian & Rajcaniova Miroslava, 2015. "The Digital Agenda of Virtual Currencies. Can BitCoin Become a Global Currency?," JRC Working Papers JRC97043, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. Deck, Cary A. & McCabe, Kevin A. & Porter, David P., 2006. "Why stable fiat money hyperinflates: Results from an experimental economy," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 471-486, November.
    3. Deck, Cary A., 2004. "Avoiding hyperinflation: Evidence from a laboratory economy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, pages 147-170.
    4. Georgios Papadopoulos, 2013. "Money and value: a synthesis of the state theory of money and original institutional economics," The Journal of Philosophical Economics, Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies, The Journal of Philosophical Economics, vol. 6(2), May.
    5. Huber, Jürgen & Shubik, Martin & Sunder, Shyam, 2014. "Sufficiency of an outside bank and a default penalty to support the value of fiat money: Experimental evidence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 317-337.
    6. Pavel Ciaian & Miroslava Rajcaniova & d’Artis Kancs, 2016. "The economics of BitCoin price formation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(19), pages 1799-1815, April.
    7. Camera, Gabriele & Vesely, Filip, 2007. "Trading horizons and the value of money," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(7), pages 1751-1767, October.
    8. Pavel Ciaian & Miroslava Rajcaniova & d’Artis Kancs, 2016. "The digital agenda of virtual currencies: Can BitCoin become a global currency?," Information Systems and e-Business Management, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 883-919, November.
    9. Tatom, John & Ott, Mack, 2006. "Money and Taxes: The Relationship Between Financial Sector Development and Taxation," MPRA Paper 4117, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Robinson, W.T. & Min, S., 1998. "Is the First to Market the First to fail?: Empirical Evidence for Manufacturing Business," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1115, Purdue University, Department of Economics.

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    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade

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