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What shapes social attitudes toward corruption in China? Micro-level evidence

Listed author(s):
  • Fungáčová, Zuzana
  • Määttä, Ilari
  • Weill, Laurent

​This research investigates the determinants of corruption in China using micro-level data. We use survey data on 6,000 households from 28 provinces to estimate logit models that show how corruption perceptions and attitudes to corruption are shaped by individual and provincial determinants. Respondents who see themselves as lower class, as well as members of the Communist Party of China, are more likely to perceive and reject corruption than other respondents. People in rural areas perceive less corruption, but do not differ in their attitudes toward corruption.

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File URL: https://helda.helsinki.fi/bof/bitstream/123456789/14432/1/dp1816.pdf
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Paper provided by Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition in its series BOFIT Discussion Papers with number 18/2016.

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Date of creation: 05 Dec 2016
Handle: RePEc:bof:bofitp:2016_018
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Bank of Finland, BOFIT, P.O. Box 160, FI-00101 Helsinki, Finland

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  1. Jakob Svensson, 2003. "Who Must Pay Bribes and How Much? Evidence from a Cross Section of Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(1), pages 207-230.
  2. Ramirez, Carlos D., 2014. "Is corruption in China “out of control”? A comparison with the US in historical perspective," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 76-91.
  3. Inna Cabelkova & Jan Hanousek, 2004. "The power of negative thinking: corruption, perception and willingness to bribe in Ukraine," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(4), pages 383-397.
  4. Song, Yang, 2014. "What should economists know about the current Chinese hukou system?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 200-212.
  5. Raymond Fisman & Yongxiang Wang, 2015. "Corruption in Chinese Privatizations," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(1), pages 1-29.
  6. Danila Serra, 2006. "Empirical determinants of corruption: A sensitivity analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 126(1), pages 225-256, January.
  7. Treisman, Daniel, 2000. "The causes of corruption: a cross-national study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 399-457, June.
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