IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bof/bofitp/2016_001.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Can the Chinese bond market facilitate a globalizing renminbi?

Author

Listed:
  • Ma, Guonan
  • Yao, Wang

Abstract

A global renminbi needs to be backed by a large, deep and liquid renminbi bond market with a world-class Chinese government bond (CGB) market as its core. China’s CGB market is the seventh largest in the world while sitting alongside a huge but non-tradable and captive central bank liability in the form of required reserves. By transforming the non-tradable cen-tral bank liabilities into homogeneous and tradable CGBs through halving the high Chinese reserve requirements, the size of the CGB market can easily double. This would help over-come some market impediments and elevate the CGBs to a top three government bond mar-ket globally, boosting market liquidity while trimming distortions to the banking system. With a foreign ownership similar to that of the JGBs, CGBs held by foreign investors may increase ten-fold by 2020, approaching 5 percent of the 2014 global foreign reserves and facilitating a potential global renminbi, especially in the wake of the renminbi’s inclusion into the basket of the IMF Special Drawing Rights.

Suggested Citation

  • Ma, Guonan & Yao, Wang, 2016. "Can the Chinese bond market facilitate a globalizing renminbi?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 1/2016, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  • Handle: RePEc:bof:bofitp:2016_001
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://helda.helsinki.fi/bof/bitstream/123456789/14020/1/dp0116.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert McCauley & Eli Remolona, 2000. "Size and liquidity of government bond markets," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, November.
    2. Guonan Ma, 2007. "Who Pays China's Bank Restructuring Bill?," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 6(1), pages 46-71, Winter.
    3. Guonan Ma & Robert N. McCauley, 2014. "Financial openness of China and India- Implications for capital account liberalisation," Working Papers 827, Bruegel.
    4. Guonan Ma & Eli Remolona & He Jianxiong, 2006. "Developing corporate bond markets in Asia: a synopsis of the Kunming discussions," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Developing corporate bond markets in Asia, volume 26, pages 1-6, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Nicolas Véron & Guntram B. Wolff, 2016. "Capital Markets Union: A Vision for the Long Term," Journal of Financial Regulation, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 130-153.
    6. Jacob Gyntelberg & Guonan Ma & Eli Remolona, 2006. "Developing corporate bond markets in Asia," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Developing corporate bond markets in Asia, volume 26, pages 13-21, Bank for International Settlements.
    7. Bank for International Settlements, 2002. "The development of bond markets in emerging economies," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 11.
    8. Jennie Bai & Michael J. Fleming & Casidhe Horan, 2013. "The Microstructure of China's Government Bond Market," Staff Reports 622, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ramaa Vasudevan, 2018. "The internationalization of the Renminbi and the evolution of China’s monetary policy," Working Papers 1810, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Sangyup Choi, 2018. "Bank Lending Standards, Loan Demand, and the Macroeconomy: Evidence from the Emerging Market Bank Loan Officer Survey," Working papers 2018rwp-126, Yonsei University, Yonsei Economics Research Institute.
    2. Jose Sidaoui, 2008. "The impact of international financial integration on Mexican financial markets," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Financial globalisation and emerging market capital flows, volume 44, pages 341-361, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Mahmood Pradhan & Shanaka J Peiris & Mangal Goswami & Dulani Seneviratne & Joshua Felman & Andreas Jobst & Simon T Gray, 2011. "Asean Bond Market Development; Where Does it Stand? Where is it Going?," IMF Working Papers 2011/137, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Simon Schumacher & Stephan Paul, 2017. "Capital Markets Union – Promising Prospects for Corporate Financing?," Schmalenbach Business Review, Springer;Schmalenbach-Gesellschaft, vol. 18(3), pages 289-304, August.
    5. Smales, L.A., 2017. "Commodity market volatility in the presence of U.S. and Chinese macroeconomic news," Journal of Commodity Markets, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 15-27.
    6. Augusto de la Torre & Juan Carlos Gozzi & Sergio L. Schmukler, 2008. "Capital Market Development: Whither Latin America?," NBER Chapters, in: Financial Markets Volatility and Performance in Emerging Markets, pages 121-154, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Mikhail Chernov & Drew D. Creal & Peter Hördahl, 2020. "Sovereign Credit and Exchange Rate Risks: Evidence from Asia-Pacific Local Currency Bonds," NBER Working Papers 27500, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Jorg Bibow, 2015. "The Euro's Savior? Assessing the ECB's Crisis Management Performance and Potential for Crisis Resolution," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_845, Levy Economics Institute.
    9. Leong Liew & Liping He, 2012. "Operating in an inharmonious world: China Investment Corporation," Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 253-267.
    10. Barry Eichengreen & Pipat Luengnaruemitchai, 2004. "Why Dones't Asia have the biger bond markets," Working Papers 242004, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    11. Guonan Ma & Yan Xiandong & Liu Xi, 2013. "China’s evolving reserve requirements," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 117-137, May.
    12. Eickmeier, Sandra & Gambacorta, Leonardo & Hofmann, Boris, 2014. "Understanding global liquidity," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 1-18.
    13. Bruno Rocha, 2010. "At Different Speeds: Policy Complementarities and the Recovery from the Asian Crisis," Working Papers id:3294, eSocialSciences.
    14. Barry Eichengreen, 2006. "The development of Asian bond markets," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Asian bond markets: issues and prospects, volume 30, pages 1-12, Bank for International Settlements.
    15. Engelbert Stockhammer & Collin Constantine & Severin Reissl, 2020. "Explaining the Euro crisis: current account imbalances, credit booms and economic policy in different economic paradigms," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 231-266, April.
    16. Marta Gómez-Puig, "undated". "The Impact of Monetary Union on EU-15 Sovereign Debt Yield Spreads," Working Papers on International Economics and Finance 05-11, FEDEA.
    17. Alicia García Herrero & Javier Santillán & Sonsoles Gallego & Lucía Cuadro & Carlos Egea, 2002. "Latin American Financial Development in Perspective," Working Papers 0216, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    18. Piotr Bartkiewicz, 2021. "The evolution of the Polish government bond market," Public Sector Economics, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 45(1), pages 149-169.
    19. Haizhou Huang & Ning Zhu, 2007. "The Chinese Bond Market: Historical Lessons, Present Challenges and Future Perspectives," Yale School of Management Working Papers amz2582, Yale School of Management, revised 21 Sep 2009.
    20. Ouyang, Alice Y. & Rajan, Ramkishen S. & Willett, Thomas D., 2010. "China as a reserve sink: The evidence from offset and sterilization coefficients," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 951-972, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • H63 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Debt; Debt Management; Sovereign Debt

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bof:bofitp:2016_001. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Minna Nyman). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/bofitfi.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.