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Do the type of sukuk and choice of shari’a scholar matter?

Listed author(s):
  • Godlewski, Christophe J.
  • Turk-Ariss, Rima
  • Weill, Laurent

​Sukuk, the shari’a-compliant alternative mode of financing to conventional bonds, have considerably expanded over the last decade. We analyze the stock market reaction to two key features of this instrument: sukuk type and characteristics of the shari’a scholar certifying the issue. We use the event study methodology to measure abnormal returns for a sample of 131 sukuk from eight countries over the period 2006-2013 and find that Ijara sukuk structures exert a positive influence on the stock price of the issuing firm. We observe a similar positive impact from shari’a scholar reputation and proximity to issuer. Overall our results support the hypotheses that the type of sukuk and the choice of scholars hired to certify these securities matter for the market valuation of the issuing company. Publication keywords: financial instruments, Islamic finance, shari’a scholars

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Paper provided by Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition in its series BOFIT Discussion Papers with number 21/2014.

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Date of creation: 03 Dec 2014
Publication status: Published in Published in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Volume 132, December 2016: 63-76
Handle: RePEc:bof:bofitp:2014_021
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Bank of Finland, BOFIT, P.O. Box 160, FI-00101 Helsinki, Finland

Phone: + 358 9 183 2268
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Web page: http://www.bofit.fi/en/
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  1. Brown, Stephen J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1985. "Using daily stock returns : The case of event studies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 3-31, March.
  2. Najeeb, Syed Faiq & Ibrahim, Shahul Hameed Mohamed, 2014. "Professionalizing the role of Shari'ah auditors: How Malaysia can generate economic benefits," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 91-109.
  3. Saiful Azhar Rosly, 2010. "Shariah parameters reconsidered," International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(2), pages 132-146, June.
  4. Kedia, Simi & Rajgopal, Shiva, 2011. "Do the SEC's enforcement preferences affect corporate misconduct?," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 259-278, April.
  5. Sattar A. Mansi & William F. Maxwell & Darius P. Miller, 2004. "Does Auditor Quality and Tenure Matter to Investors? Evidence from the Bond Market," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(4), pages 755-793, 09.
  6. Jeong-Bon Kim & Byron Song & Judy Tsui, 2013. "Auditor size, tenure, and bank loan pricing," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 75-99, January.
  7. Datar, Srikant M. & Feltham, Gerald A. & Hughes, John S., 1991. "The role of audits and audit quality in valuing new issues," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 3-49, March.
  8. Brown, Stephen J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1980. "Measuring security price performance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 205-258, September.
  9. Rodney Wilson, 2009. "The development of Islamic finance in the GCC," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 55281, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  10. Kathleen Fuller & Jeffry Netter & Mike Stegemoller, 2002. "What Do Returns to Acquiring Firms Tell Us? Evidence from Firms That Make Many Acquisitions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(4), pages 1763-1793, 08.
  11. Godlewski, Christophe J. & Turk-Ariss, Rima & Weill, Laurent, 2013. "Sukuk vs. conventional bonds: A stock market perspective," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 745-761.
  12. Campbell, Cynthia J. & Cowan, Arnold R. & Salotti, Valentina, 2010. "Multi-country event-study methods," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 3078-3090, December.
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