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Identifying structural shocks behind loan supply fluctuations in Russia

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  • Deryugina, Elena B.
  • Ponomarenko, Alexey A.

Abstract

We examine the drivers behind loan supply fluctuations in Russia using Bayesian vector autoregressive model with sign restrictions on impulse response functions. We identify two types of structural innovations: loan supply shock and monetary stance shock. We find that contractionary shocks of both types contributed significantly and in the roughly equal measure to the decrease of bank lending after the Lehman Brothers collapse.

Suggested Citation

  • Deryugina, Elena B. & Ponomarenko, Alexey A., 2011. "Identifying structural shocks behind loan supply fluctuations in Russia," BOFIT Discussion Papers 20/2011, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  • Handle: RePEc:bof:bofitp:2011_020
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    Cited by:

    1. Rilind Kabashi & Katerina Suleva, 2016. "Loan Supply Shocks in Macedonia: A Bayesian SVAR Approach with Sign Restrictions," Croatian Economic Survey, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb, vol. 18(1), pages 5-33, June.
    2. Борзых Ольга Алексеевна, 2016. "«Антиэффект» Ликвидности В Российской Банковской Системе," Higher School of Economics Economic Journal Экономический журнал Высшей школы экономики, CyberLeninka;Федеральное государственное автономное образовательное учреждение высшего образования «Национальный исследовательский университет «Высшая школа экономики», vol. 20(3), pages 377-414.
    3. Makram El-Shagi & Kiril Tochkov, 2021. "Divisia Monetary Aggregates for Russia: Money Demand, GDP Nowcasting, and the Price Puzzle," CFDS Discussion Paper Series 2021/1, Center for Financial Development and Stability at Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan, China.
    4. Borzykh, Olga, 2016. "Bank lending channel in Russia: A TVP-FAVAR approach," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 43, pages 96-117.

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