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Government Expenditures, Military Spending and Economic Growth: Causality Evidence from Egypt, Israel and Syria

Author

Listed:
  • Suleiman Abu-Bader

    () (Department of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)

  • Aamer Abu-Qarn

    () (Department of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)

Abstract

This study uses multivariate cointegration and variance decomposition techniques to investigate the causal relationship between government expenditures and economic growth for Egypt, Israel and Syria, for the past three decades. When testing for causality within a bivariate system of total government spending and economic growth, we find bi-directional causality from government spending to economic growth with a negative long-term relationship between the two variables. However, when testing for causality within a trivariate system ¬– the share of government civilian expenditures in GDP, military burden and economic growth – we find that the military burden negatively affects economic growth for all the countries, and that civilian government expenditures cause positive economic growth in Israel and Egypt.

Suggested Citation

  • Suleiman Abu-Bader & Aamer Abu-Qarn, 2003. "Government Expenditures, Military Spending and Economic Growth: Causality Evidence from Egypt, Israel and Syria," Working Papers 163, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bgu:wpaper:163
    as

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    File URL: http://in.bgu.ac.il/en/humsos/Econ/Working/163.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Middle East; economic growth; government expenditure; military burden; Granger causality and error correction models;

    JEL classification:

    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • N15 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Asia including Middle East

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