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A Comparative Perspective on Italy's Human Capital Accumulation

  • Giuseppe Bertola

    ()

    (Edhec Business School and CEPR)

  • Paolo Sestito

    ()

    (Bank of Italy)

This paper reviews the evolution of educational institutions and outcomes over the 150 years since Italy's unification, and discusses their interaction with national and regional growth patterns. While initial educational conditions contributed to differentiate across regions the early industrial take off in the late 19th century, and formal education does not appear to have played a major role in the postwar economic boom, the slowdown of Italy's economy since the 1990s may be partly due to interactions between its traditionally low human capital intensity and new comparative advantage patterns, and to the deterioration since the 1970s of the educational system's organization.

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File URL: http://www.bancaditalia.it/pubblicazioni/quaderni-storia/2011-0006/Qse_06.pdf
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Paper provided by Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area in its series Quaderni di storia economica (Economic History Working Papers) with number 06.

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Date of creation: Oct 2011
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Handle: RePEc:bdi:workqs:qse_6
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  1. Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Michael Kremer, 2011. "Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1739-74, August.
  2. Wößmann, Ludger, 2007. "International evidence on school competition, autonomy, and accountability: A review," Munich Reprints in Economics 19649, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  3. Elena Meschi & Francesco Scervini, 2014. "A new dataset on educational inequality," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 695-716, September.
  4. Barbieri, Gianna & Rossetti, Claudio & Sestito, Paolo, 2011. "The determinants of teacher mobility: Evidence using Italian teachers’ transfer applications," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1430-1444.
  5. Giuseppe Bertola & Daniele Checchi & Veruska Oppedisano, 2007. "Private School Quality in Italy," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 66(3), pages 375-400, November.
  6. Eric Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2009. "Do Better Schools Lead to More Growth? Cognitive Skills, Economic Outcomes, and Causation," Discussion Papers 08-015, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  7. Massimiliano Landi & Antonio Merlo & Vincenzo Galasso & Andrea Mattozzi, 2008. "The Labor Market of Italian Politicians," Labor Economics Working Papers 22461, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  8. Bratti, Massimiliano & Checchi, Daniele & Filippin, Antonio, 2007. "Territorial Differences in Italian Students’ Mathematical Competencies: Evidence from PISA 2003," IZA Discussion Papers 2603, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Fenoaltea, Stefano, 2003. "Peeking Backward: Regional Aspects of Industrial Growth in Post-Unification Italy," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 63(04), pages 1059-1102, December.
  10. Vittorio Daniele & Paolo Malanima, 2007. "Il prodotto delle regioni e il divario Nord-Sud in Italia (1861-2004)," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 97(2), pages 267-316, March-Apr.
  11. Checchi,Daniele, 2008. "The Economics of Education," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521066464, june. pag.
  12. Luigi Cannari & Francesco Nucci & Paolo Sestito, 2000. "Geographic labour mobility and the cost of housing: evidence from Italy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(14), pages 1899-1906.
  13. Luisa GAGLIARDI & Marco PERCOCO, 2011. "Regional Disparities In Italy Over The Long Run: The Role Of Human Capital And Trade Policy," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 33, pages 81-105.
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