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Information Spillovers in Irrigation Technology Diffusion: Social Learning, Extension Visits and Spatial Effects

Listed author(s):
  • Vangelis TZOUVELEKAS
  • Celine Nauges

    ()

    (University of Toulouse)

  • Phoebe Koundouri

    (Dept. of International and European Economic Studies, Athens University of Economics and Business)

  • Margarita Genius

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Crete)

In this paper we investigate the role of information spillovers in promoting irrigation technology adoption and diffusion. In particular, we investigate the effect of different channels of information spillovers, namely social learning and formal extension visits, while acknowledging that this effect is a function of farm-specific spatial, qualitative and socio-economic characteristics. For doing so we develop a theoretical model of irrigation technology adoption and diffusion which is applied empirically using duration analysis and a micro-dataset of olive producing farms in Crete. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that brings together, both theoretically and empirically, three strands of the adoption and diffusion literature: (i) the literature on extension visits, (ii) the literature on social learning and, (iii) the literature on spatial aspects of adoption and diffusion.

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Paper provided by Athens University of Economics and Business in its series DEOS Working Papers with number 1133.

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Handle: RePEc:aue:wpaper:1133
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  1. Awudu Abdulai & Wallace E. Huffman, 2005. "The Diffusion of New Agricultural Technologies: The Case of Crossbred-Cow Technology in Tanzania," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 645-659.
  2. Ben Groom & Phoebe Koundouri & Celine Nauges & Alban Thomas, 2008. "The story of the moment: risk averse cypriot farmers respond to drought management," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 315-326.
  3. Woittiez, Isolde & Kapteyn, Arie, 1998. "Social interactions and habit formation in a model of female labour supply," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 185-205, November.
  4. Birkhaeuser, Dean & Evenson, Robert E & Feder, Gershon, 1991. "The Economic Impact of Agricultural Extension: A Review," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(3), pages 607-650, April.
  5. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
  6. Saha Atanu & H. Alan Love & Robert Schwart, 1994. "Adoption of Emerging Technologies Under Output Uncertainty," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 76(4), pages 836-846.
  7. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2010. "Learning about a New Technology: Pineapple in Ghana," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 35-69, March.
  8. Suzi Kerr & Richard G. Newell, 2003. "Policy-Induced Technology Adoption: Evidence from the U.S. Lead Phasedown," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 317-343, September.
  9. Huffman, Wallace E & Mercier, Stephanie, 1991. "Joint Adoption of Microcomputer Technologies: An Analysis of Farmers' Decisions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(3), pages 541-546, August.
  10. Chokri Dridi & Madhu Khanna, 2005. "Irrigation Technology Adoption and Gains from Water Trading under Asymmetric Information," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(2), pages 289-301.
  11. Michael R. Rahm & Wallace E. Huffman, 1984. "The Adoption of Reduced Tillage: The Role of Human Capital and Other Variables," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 66(4), pages 405-413.
  12. Ariel Dinar & Mark Campbell & David Zilberman, 1992. "Adoption of improved irrigation and drainage reduction technologies under limiting environmental conditions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(4), pages 373-398, July.
  13. Phoebe Koundouri & Céline Nauges & Vangelis Tzouvelekas, 2006. "Technology Adoption under Production Uncertainty: Theory and Application to Irrigation Technology," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(3), pages 657-670.
  14. Jean-Philippe Gervais & Rémy Lambert & François Boutin-Dufresne, 2001. "On the Demand for Information Services: An Application to Lowbush Blueberry Producers in Eastern Canada," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 49(2), pages 217-232, July.
  15. Jeremy G. Weber, 2012. "Social learning and technology adoption: the case of coffee pruning in Peru," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 43, pages 73-84, November.
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