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Proactive Customers Integration as Drivers of an Integrated Food Chain


  • Sundmaeker, Harald


Competitiveness of European Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SME) in the global marketplace is correlated to and determined by diverse factors. However, specifically SME’s ability to satisfy explicit and implicit customer requirements as well as to proactively integrate them as a driver of complex business networks is a key success factor. Although this seems to be the most obvious economic principle, it is hard to be achieved in complex networks of small actors, including vertical and horizontal supply chain dimensions, especially due to self-organisation of single network entities in relation to the continuous and dynamic adjustment of the overall network. Moreover, dynamically changing customer needs, evolving requirements (e.g. legislative demands, technology enablers) and process disturbances (e.g. delivery deviations, incompatibility of supplied semi-finished products) need to be handled.

Suggested Citation

  • Sundmaeker, Harald, 2008. "Proactive Customers Integration as Drivers of an Integrated Food Chain," 110th Seminar, February 18-22, 2008, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 49892, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eea110:49892

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Levine, Ross & Zervos, Sara, 1998. "Stock Markets, Banks, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 537-558, June.
    2. Ellickson, Paul, 2005. "Supermarkets as a Natural Oligopoly," Working Papers 05-04, Duke University, Department of Economics.
    3. Sodano, Valeria & Hingley, Martin, 2007. "Channel Management and differentiation strategies: A case study from the market for fresh produce," 105th Seminar, March 8-10, 2007, Bologna, Italy 7869, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
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    More about this item


    Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy; Farm Management; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Industrial Organization;

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