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Institutional Perspectives Of Enhancing Smallholder Market Access In South Africa

  • Magingxa, Litha Light
  • Kamara, Abdul B.
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    There is growing evidence that many smallholder farmers can benefit from market-oriented agriculture. However, smallholders often face a number of barriers to accessing the markets. Smallholder market access is much cited as a factor that exacerbates the smallholder situation but little researched. This issue cannot be addressed completely without taking a holistic perspective that also takes into account the global trends in economic transformation that have a direct bearing on the current smallholder market access situation. A growing number of scholars advocate the need for an institutional analysis in trying to understand these issues

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    Paper provided by Agricultural Economic Association of South Africa (AEASA) in its series 2003 Annual Conference, October 2-3, 2003, Pretoria, South Africa with number 19077.

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    Date of creation: 2003
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aeassa:19077
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    1. Bryceson, Deborah Fahy, 2002. "The Scramble in Africa: Reorienting Rural Livelihoods," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 725-739, May.
    2. Brinkerhoff, Derick W. & Goldsmith, Arthur A., 1992. "Promoting the sustainability of development institutions: A framework for strategy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 369-383, March.
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    4. Kherallah, Mylène & Kirsten, Johann, 2001. "The new institutional economics," MTID discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Delgado, Christopher L. & Hopkins, Jane & Kelly , Valerie & Hazell, P. B. R. & McKenna, Anna A. & Gruhn, Peter & Hojjati, Behjat & Sil, Jayashree & Courbois, Claude, 1998. "Agricultural growth linkages in Sub-Saharan Africa:," Research reports 107, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Huang, Qiuqiong & Rozelle, Scott & Lohmar, Bryan & Huang, Jikun & Wang, Jinxia, 2006. "Irrigation, agricultural performance and poverty reduction in China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 30-52, February.
    7. J. Zyl & T. I. Fényes & N. Vink, 1992. "Effects Of The Farmer Support Programme And Changes In Marketing Policies On Maize Production In South Africa," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 466-476.
    8. Ellis, Frank, 2000. "Rural Livelihoods and Diversity in Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296966.
    9. Kherallah, Mylène & Delgado, Christopher L. & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Minot, Nicholas & Johnson, Michael, 2002. "Reforming agricultural markets in Africa," Food policy statements 38, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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