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The Determinants of Child Schooling in Nigeria

Listed author(s):
  • Olanrewaju Olaniyan
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    This study explores the determinants of child schooling in Nigeria and takes current enrolment and delayed entry into schools as measures of schooling outcome. The study utilized reduced form relationships for male and female children within urban and rural households. Using data from the 1999 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) of Nigeria, the study found that socioeconomic backgrounds of children are significant determinants of schooling with education of parents being the most important determinant. Educated parents desire more schooling for their children. Our decomposition analysis revealed that the way a household treats boys and girls in urban areas contracts the gender gap in enrolment, while it widens the gap in rural areas.

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    File URL: http://aercafrica.org/index.php/publications/doc_download/5-the-determinants-of-child-schooling-in-nigeria
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    Paper provided by African Economic Research Consortium in its series Research Papers with number RP_217.

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    Length: 41 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 2011
    Handle: RePEc:aer:rpaper:rp_217
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    1. Handa, Sudhanshu, 2002. "Raising primary school enrolment in developing countries: The relative importance of supply and demand," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 103-128, October.
    2. William E. Even & David A. Macpherson, 1993. "The Decline of Private-Sector Unionism and the Gender Wage Gap," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(2), pages 279-296.
    3. Glick, Peter & Sahn, David E., 2006. "The demand for primary schooling in Madagascar: Price, quality, and the choice between public and private providers," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 118-145, February.
    4. Glewwe, Paul, et al, 1995. "An Eclectic Approach to Estimating the Determinants of Achievement in Jamaican Primary Education," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 9(2), pages 231-258, May.
    5. Behrman, Jere R & Knowles, James C, 1999. "Household Income and Child Schooling in Vietnam," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 211-256, May.
    6. Melissa Binder, 1998. "Family background, gender and schooling in Mexico," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 54-71.
    7. Tansel, Aysit, 2002. "Determinants of school attainment of boys and girls in Turkey: individual, household and community factors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 455-470, October.
    8. Gomulka, Joanna & Stern, Nicholas, 1990. "The Employment of Married Women in the United Kingdom 1970-83," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 57(226), pages 171-199, May.
    9. Alderman, Harold, et al, 1996. "The Returns to Endogenous Human Capital in Pakistan's Rural Wage Labour Market," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(1), pages 29-55, February.
    10. Sahn, David E. & Stifel, David C., 2000. "Poverty Comparisons Over Time and Across Countries in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 2123-2155, December.
    11. Paul Glewwe & Hanan Jacoby, 1994. "Student Achievement and Schooling Choice in Low-Income Countries: Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(3), pages 843-864.
    12. Handa, Sudhanshu & Simler, Kenneth R. & Harrower, Sarah, 2004. "Human capital, household welfare, and children's schooling in Mozambique:," Research reports 134, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Behrman, Jere R & Birdsall, Nancy, 1983. "The Quality of Schooling: Quantity Alone is Misleading," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(5), pages 928-946, December.
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