IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Multidimensional Poverty in Cameroon: Determinants and Spatial Distribution


  • Tochukwu E. Nwachukwu
  • Peter Odigie


This study discusses the trend in Nigerian saving behaviour and reviews policy options to increase domestic saving. It also examines the determinants of private saving in Nigeria during the 1970-2007 period. It makes an important contribution to literature by evaluating the magnitude and direction of the effects of the following key policy and non-policy variables on private saving: Income growth, interest rate, fiscal policy and financial development. The framework for analysis involves the estimation of a saving rate function derived from the life cycle hypothesis while recognizing the structural characteristics of a developing economy. The study employs the Error-Correction Modelling procedure which minimizes the possibility of estimating spurious relations, while retaining long-run information. The results of the analysis show that the saving rate rises with both the growth rate of disposable income and the real interest rate on bank deposits. Public saving seems not to crowd out private saving, suggesting that government policies aimed at improving the fiscal balance have the potential of bringing about a substantial increase in the national saving rate. Finally, the degree of financial depth has a negative but insignificant impact on saving behaviour in Nigeria.

Suggested Citation

  • Tochukwu E. Nwachukwu & Peter Odigie, 2011. "Multidimensional Poverty in Cameroon: Determinants and Spatial Distribution," Research Papers RP_212, African Economic Research Consortium.
  • Handle: RePEc:aer:rpaper:rp_212

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chirinko, Robert S, 1993. "Business Fixed Investment Spending: Modeling Strategies, Empirical Results, and Policy Implications," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 31(4), pages 1875-1911, December.
    2. Bruno Crépon & Christian Gianella, 2001. "Fiscalité et coût d'usage du capital : incidences sur l'investissement, l'activité et l'emploi," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 341(1), pages 107-128.
    3. Robert S. Chirinko, 1992. "Business Fixed Investment Spending: A Critical survey of Modeling Strategies, Empirical Results, and Policy Implications," Working Papers 9213, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    4. Avinash K. Dixit & Robert S. Pindyck, 1994. "Investment under Uncertainty," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 5474.
    5. Carruth, Alan & Dickerson, Andrew & Henley, Andrew, 2000. " What Do We Know about Investment under Uncertainty?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(2), pages 119-153, April.
    6. Bertola, Giuseppe, 1998. "Irreversible investment," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 3-37, March.
    7. Abel, Andrew B. & Eberly, Janice C., 1997. "An exact solution for the investment and value of a firm facing uncertainty, adjustment costs, and irreversibility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(4-5), pages 831-852, May.
    8. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    9. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    10. Robert McDonald & Daniel Siegel, 1986. "The Value of Waiting to Invest," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 101(4), pages 707-727.
    11. François Legendre & Fabrice Paretti, 1997. "Investissement et profitabilité. Un modèle néo-classique et son estimation sur données de branches industrielles françaises," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 48(1), pages 107-122.
    12. Maddala, G S & Wu, Shaowen, 1999. " A Comparative Study of Unit Root Tests with Panel Data and a New Simple Test," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 631-652, Special I.
    13. Jean-Baptiste Herbet, 2001. "Peut-on expliquer l'investissement à partir de ses déterminants traditionnels au cours de la décennie 90 ?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 341(1), pages 85-106.
    14. Catherine Pattillo, 1998. "Investment, Uncertainty, and Irreversibility in Ghana," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(3), pages 522-553, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aer:rpaper:rp_212. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Steven Kinuthia). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.