IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/aer/rpaper/rp_172.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Sources of Technical Efficiency among Smallholder Maize Farmers in Southern Malawi

Author

Listed:
  • Ephraim W. Chirwa

Abstract

The agricultural sector in Malawi is vital to the economy for incomes and food security. The sector accounts for 35% of national income, generates 90% of foreign exchange, and provides paid and self-employment to 92% of the rural population. One constraint in achieving food security has been the small size and fragmented nature of land holdings among a large proportion of households in Malawi. Nonetheless, since independence there have been several attempts by the government to improve the productivity of food crops on small farms, particularly for maize, including the development of high yielding maize varieties, subsidization of farm inputs, provision of credit facilities, and the liberalization of both farm produce prices and farm produce marketing. While there have been several studies on food production in Malawi, the focus has mainly been on technology development and adoption, production constraints, the impact of structural adjustment policies, and the impact of price and marketing liberalization. This paper estimates technical efficiency among smallholder maize farmers in Malawi and identifies sources of inefficiency using plot-level data. We find that smallholder maize farmers in Malawi are inefficient; the average efficiency score is 46.23% and 79% of the plots have efficiency scores below 70%. The results of the study reveal that inefficiency declines on plots planted with hybrid seeds and for those controlled by farmers who belong to households with membership in a farmers club or association.

Suggested Citation

  • Ephraim W. Chirwa, 2007. "Sources of Technical Efficiency among Smallholder Maize Farmers in Southern Malawi," Research Papers RP_172 Key words: smallho, African Economic Research Consortium.
  • Handle: RePEc:aer:rpaper:rp_172
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aercafrica.org/documents/RP172.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tahiru, Fulera & Fosu, Mathias & Gaiser, Thomas & Becker, Mathias & Inusah, Baba I. Y. & Mutari, Abubakari & Buah, S. S. J. & Atakora, Williams Kwame & Mohammed, Askia M., 2015. "Fertilizer and Genotype Effects on Maize Production on Two Soils in the Northern Region of Ghana," Sustainable Agriculture Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 4(4).
    2. Namonje-Kapembwa, Thelma & Black, Roy & Jayne, Thomas S., 2015. "Does Late Delivery of Subsidized Fertilizer Affect Smallholder Maize Productivity and Production?," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205288, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Salau, S.A., 2013. "Cropping Intensification and Technical Inefficiency of Maize-Based Farming Households in Southern-Guinea Savanna (SGS) of Nigeria," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161643, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aer:rpaper:rp_172. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Steven Kinuthia). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aerccke.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.