IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/psi244.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Omer Siddique

Personal Details

First Name:Omer
Middle Name:
Last Name:Siddique
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psi244
Department of Economics New School University 79 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10003 U.S.A.

Affiliation

(in no particular order)

Pakistan Institute of Development Economics

Islamabad, Pakistan
http://www.pide.org.pk/

(92)(51)9248051
(92)(51)9248065
P.O.Box 1091, Islamabad-44000
RePEc:edi:pideipk (more details at EDIRC)

Department of Economics
New School for Social Research
The New School

New York City, New York (United States)
http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/economics/

(212) 229-5717
(212) 229-5724
65 Fifth Avenue, Room 350, New York, NY 10003
RePEc:edi:denewus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Musleh-Ud Din & Ejaz Ghani & Omer Siddique, 2003. "Openness and Economic Growth in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(4), pages 795-807.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Musleh-Ud Din & Ejaz Ghani & Omer Siddique, 2003. "Openness and Economic Growth in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(4), pages 795-807.

    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad Arshad Khan & Abdul Qayyum, 2006. "Trade Liberalisation, Financial Sector Reforms, and Growth," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 45(4), pages 711-731.
    2. Muhammad Arshad Khan & Abdul Qayyum, 2007. "Trade Liberalisation, Financial Development and Economic Growth," PIDE-Working Papers 2007:19, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    3. Muhammad Arshad Khan & Ayaz Ahmed, 2012. "Modelling Trade, Investment, Growth and Liberalisation: Case Study of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 51(4), pages 187-208.
    4. Anupam Das & Biru Paksha Paul, 2011. "Openness and growth in emerging Asian economies: Evidence from GMM estimations of a dynamic panel," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2219-2228.
    5. Matthew McCartney, 2011. "Pakistan, Growth, Dependency, and Crisis," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 16(Special E), pages 71-94, September.
    6. Nasir Iqbal & Musleh Ud Din & Ejaz Ghani, 2012. "Fiscal Decentralisation and Economic Growth: Role of Democratic Institutions," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 51(3), pages 173-195.
    7. Saima Nawaz & Nasir Iqbal & Muhammad Arshad Khan, 2014. "The Impact of Institutional Quality on Economic Growth: Panel Evidence," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 53(1), pages 15-31.
    8. Bianka Dettmer, 2012. "Business services outsourcing and economic growth: Evidence from a dynamic panel data approach," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-049, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    9. Matthew McCartney, 2015. "The Missing Economic Magic: The Failure of Trade Liberalization and Exchange Rate Devaluation in Pakistan, 1980–2012," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 20(Special E), pages 59-86, September.
    10. Aboohamidi, Abbas & Chidmi, Benaissa, 2013. "Female Labor Force Participation in Pakistan and Some MENA Countries," 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida 143097, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    11. Liaqat Ali & Jianing Mi & Mussawar Shah & Sayed Jamal Shah & Salim khan & Kausar BiBi, 2017. "The Potential Socio-Economic Impact of China Pakistan Economic Corridor," Asian Development Policy Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(4), pages 191-198, December.
    12. Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2012. "Does trade openness affect long run growth? Cointegration, causality and forecast error variance decomposition tests for Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2325-2339.
    13. Maryiam Haroon, 2017. "Free Trade: Does Myopic Policy Overlook Long-Term Gains?," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 22(2), pages 65-88, July-Dec.
    14. Syed Tehseen Jawaid, Abdul Waheed, 2017. "Uncertainty and Risk Analysis of Pakistan's Regional Trade: Fan Chart Approach," Journal of Management Sciences, Geist Science, Iqra University, Faculty of Business Administration, vol. 4(1), pages 55-81, March.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

Featured entries

This author is featured on the following reading lists, publication compilations or Wikipedia entries:
  1. PIDE/SBP related Economists

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Omer Siddique should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.