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Max Roser

Personal Details

First Name:Max
Middle Name:
Last Name:Roser
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pro1089
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.maxroser.com
Twitter: @maxcroser

Affiliation

Economics
Oxford Martin School
Oxford University

Oxford, United Kingdom
http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/economics

:


RePEc:edi:inoxfuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Olivier Sterck & Max Roser & Stefan Thewissen, 2017. "Turning the paradigm of aid allocation on its head," CSAE Working Paper Series 2017-03, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  2. Felix Pretis & Max Roser, 2016. "Carbon Dioxide Emission-Intensity in Climate Projections: Comparing the Observational Record to Socio-Economic Scenarios," Economics Series Working Papers 810, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Crespo Cuaresma, Jesus & Roser, Max, 2011. "Borders redrawn: Measuring the statistical creation of international trade," Working Papers in Economics 2011-4, University of Salzburg.

Articles

  1. Pretis, Felix & Roser, Max, 2017. "Carbon dioxide emission-intensity in climate projections: Comparing the observational record to socio-economic scenarios," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 718-725.
  2. Max Roser & Jesus Crespo Cuaresma, 2016. "Why is Income Inequality Increasing in the Developed World?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62(1), pages 1-27, March.
  3. Jesus Crespo Cuaresma & Max Roser, 2012. "Borders Redrawn: Measuring the Statistical Creation of International Trade," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(7), pages 946-952, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Felix Pretis & Max Roser, 2016. "Carbon Dioxide Emission-Intensity in Climate Projections: Comparing the Observational Record to Socio-Economic Scenarios," Economics Series Working Papers 810, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. David Hendry & Andrew B. Martinez, 2016. "Evaluating Multi-Step System Forecasts with Relatively Few Forecast-Error Observations," Economics Series Working Papers 784, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Badrinarayanan, Rajagopalan & Tseng, King Jet & Soong, Boon Hee & Wei, Zhongbao, 2017. "Modelling and control of vanadium redox flow battery for profile based charging applications," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 1479-1488.
    3. Cheng, Shulei & Wu, Yinyin & Chen, Hua & Chen, Jiandong & Song, Malin & Hou, Wenxuan, 2019. "Determinants of changes in electricity generation intensity among different power sectors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 389-408.
    4. Jinkai Li & Jingjing Ma & Wei Wei, 2020. "Analysis and Evaluation of the Regional Characteristics of Carbon Emission Efficiency for China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(8), pages 1-22, April.
    5. Wang, Shaojian & Wang, Jieyu & Fang, Chuanglin & Feng, Kuishuang, 2019. "Inequalities in carbon intensity in China: A multi-scalar and multi-mechanism analysis," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 254(C).
    6. Gui, Shusen & Wu, Chunyou & Qu, Ying & Guo, Lingling, 2017. "Path analysis of factors impacting China's CO2 emission intensity: Viewpoint on energy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 650-658.
    7. David I. Stern, 2017. "How accurate are energy intensity projections?," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 143(3), pages 537-545, August.

Articles

  1. Pretis, Felix & Roser, Max, 2017. "Carbon dioxide emission-intensity in climate projections: Comparing the observational record to socio-economic scenarios," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 718-725. See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Max Roser & Jesus Crespo Cuaresma, 2016. "Why is Income Inequality Increasing in the Developed World?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62(1), pages 1-27, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Heimberger, 2019. "Beeinflusst die ökonomische Globalisierung die Einkommensungleichheit? Eine Meta-Analyse," Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft - WuG, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik, vol. 45(4), pages 497-529.
    2. Philipp Heimberger, 2019. "Does Economic Globalisation Affect Income Inequality? A Meta-analysis," wiiw Working Papers 165, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    3. Enrico D'Elia & Roberta De Santis, 2018. "Growth divergence and income inequality in OECD countries:the role of trade and financial openness," Working Papers 5, Department of the Treasury, Ministry of the Economy and of Finance.
    4. Philipp Heimberger, 2020. "The dynamic effects of fiscal consolidation episodes on income inequality: evidence for 17 OECD countries over 1978–2013," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 47(1), pages 53-81, February.
    5. T. Gries & R. Grundmann & I. Palnau & M. Redlin, 2017. "Innovations, growth and participation in advanced economies - a review of major concepts and findings," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 293-351, April.
    6. Stefania Gabriele & Enrico D’Elia, 2019. "Labour and capital remuneration in the OECD countries," Working Papers LuissLab 19146, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
    7. Aurora A. C. Teixeira & Ana Sofia Loureiro, 2019. "FDI, income inequality and poverty: a time series analysis of Portugal, 1973–2016," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer;Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestao, vol. 18(3), pages 203-249, October.
    8. Andreas Bergh & Irina Mirkina & Therese Nilsson, 2020. "Can social spending cushion the inequality effect of globalization?," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(1), pages 104-142, March.
    9. Andoni Fornio Barusman & Dr. M. Yusuf Sulfarano Barusman, 2017. "The Impact of International Trade on Income Inequality in the United States since 1970's," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(4A), pages 35-50.
    10. Christian A. Belabed, 2016. "Inequality and the New Deal," IMK Working Paper 166-2016, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    11. Jochen Hartwig & Jan Egbert Sturm, 2019. "Do fiscal rules breed inequality? First evidence for the EU," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(2), pages 1508-1515.
    12. Philipp Heimberger, 2018. "The Dynamic Effects of Fiscal Consolidation Episodes on Income Inequality," wiiw Working Papers 147, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    13. Sugiharso Safuan, 2017. "ASEAN-China Free Trade Area: An Assessment of Tariff Elimination Effect on Welfare," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(4B), pages 27-37.
    14. Peter Mandzak, "undated". "The Impact of Fiscal Consolidation on Inequality:The Case of V4 Countries," Department of Economic Policy Working Paper Series 015, Department of Economic Policy, Faculty of National Economy, University of Economics in Bratislava.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2017-03-19. Author is listed
  2. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2016-11-20. Author is listed
  3. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2016-11-20. Author is listed
  4. NEP-PPM: Project, Program & Portfolio Management (1) 2017-03-19. Author is listed
  5. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (1) 2016-11-20. Author is listed

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