IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pra202.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Michael Rashes

Personal Details

First Name:Michael
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rashes
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pra202
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:1999 Department of Economics; Harvard University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Bracebridge Capital

http://brbrcap.com
Cambridge, MA

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Michael S. Rashes, 2001. "Massively Confused Investors Making Conspicuously Ignorant Choices (MCI-MCIC)," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(5), pages 1911-1927, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Michael S. Rashes, 2001. "Massively Confused Investors Making Conspicuously Ignorant Choices (MCI-MCIC)," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(5), pages 1911-1927, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Bahloul, Walid & Bouri, Abdelfettah, 2016. "The impact of investor sentiment on returns and conditional volatility in U.S. futures markets," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 89-102.
    2. Sophie Moinas & Sébastien Pouget, 2016. "The bubble game: A classroom experiment," Post-Print halshs-01522491, HAL.
    3. Bruna Ecchia, 2017. "Financial Market Evaluative Inefficiencies and Companies Sub-Optimal Investment Choices: How to Get Out of the Shortermist Impasse?," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 9(5), pages 143-155, May.
    4. David Hirshleifer & TYLER G. SHUMWAY, 2004. "Good Day Sunshine: Stock Returns and the Weather," Finance 0412004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Stefano DellaVigna, 2009. "Psychology and Economics: Evidence from the Field," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 315-372, June.
    6. Kadapakkam, Palani-Rajan & Zhang, Hongxian, 2014. "Investor ignorance in markets for worthless stocks," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 197-218.
    7. Hirshleifer, David & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar & Titman, Sheridan, 2006. "Feedback and the success of irrational investors," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 311-338, August.
    8. Marshall, Ben R., 2009. "How quickly is temporary market inefficiency removed?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 917-930, August.
    9. Hirshleifer, David & Teoh, Siew Hong, 2005. "Limited Investor Attention and Stock Market Misreactions to Accounting Information," Working Paper Series 2005-24, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
    10. Kelly Shue & Erzo F. P. Luttmer, 2006. "Who Misvotes? The Effect of Differential Cognition Costs on Election Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 12709, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Hirshleifer, David, 2014. "Behavioral Finance," MPRA Paper 59028, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Durham, Greg & Santhanakrishnan, Mukunthan, 2016. "Ticker fluency, sentiment, and asset valuation," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 89-96.
    13. KIM, Y. Han (Andy) & Jung, Hosung, 2016. "Investor PSY-chology surrounding “Gangnam Style”," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 23-34.
    14. Troug, Haytem Ahmed & Sbia, Rashid, 2015. "Testing for the Presence of Asymmetric Information in the Oil Market: A VAR Approach," MPRA Paper 64933, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Wu, YiLin, 2010. "What's in a name? What leads a firm to change its name and what the new name foreshadows," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1344-1359, June.
    16. Haizhen Wang & Ratthachat Chatpatanasiri & Pairote Sattayatham, 2017. "Stock Trading Using PE ratio: A Dynamic Bayesian Network Modeling on Behavioral Finance and Fundamental Investment," Papers 1706.02985, arXiv.org.
    17. Huang, Yuqin & Qiu, Huiyan & Wu, Zhiguo, 2016. "Local bias in investor attention: Evidence from China's Internet stock message boards," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(PA), pages 338-354.
    18. Baryla Jr., Edward A. & Borghesi, Richard A. & Dare, William H. & Dennis, Steven A., 2007. "Learning, price formation and the early season bias in the NBA," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 155-164, September.
    19. Xing, Xuejing & Anderson, Randy I. & Hu, Yan, 2016. "What׳s a name worth? The impact of a likeable stock ticker symbol on firm value," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 63-80.
    20. Daniel, Kent & Hirshleifer, David & Teoh, Siew Hong, 2002. "Investor psychology in capital markets: evidence and policy implications," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 139-209, January.
    21. Head, Alex & Smith, Gary & Wilson, Julia, 2009. "Would a stock by any other ticker smell as sweet?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 551-561, May.
    22. Woodhouse, Sam Alan & Singh, Harminder & Bhattacharya, Sukanto & Kumar, Kuldeep, 2016. "Invisible walls: Do psychological barriers really exist in stock index levels?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 267-278.
    23. Morgan, John & Ong, David & Zhong, Zemin (Zachary), 2018. "Location still matters: Evidence from an online shopping field experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 43-54.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Michael Rashes should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.