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Citations of

Bryn Battersby

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Bryn Battersby & Michael Kouparitsas & Josiah Munro, 2013. "Uncovering the sources of sectoral employment fluctuations," Treasury Working Papers 2013-03, The Treasury, Australian Government, revised Sep 2013.

    Cited by:

    1. International Monetary Fund, 2014. "Australia; Staff Report for 2013 Article IV Consultation-Staff Report; Press Release; and Statement by the Executive Director for Australia," IMF Staff Country Reports 14/51, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Josef Manalo & Dilhan Perera & Daniel Rees, 2014. "Exchange Rate Movements and the Australian Economy," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2014-11, Reserve Bank of Australia.

Articles

  1. Bryn Battersby, 2007. "Does distance matter?: The effect of geographic isolation on productivity levels," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2006(1), pages 205-225.

    Cited by:

    1. Jyoti Rahman, 2005. "Comparing Australian and United States productivity," Economic Roundup, The Treasury, Australian Government, issue 2, pages 27-45, June.
    2. Gregory, Robert G., 2012. "Living standards, terms of trade and foreign ownership: reflections on the Australian mining boom," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 56(2), June.
    3. Ben Dolman & Dean Parham & Simon Zheng, 2007. "Can Australia Match US Productivity Performance?," Staff Working Papers 0703, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
    4. Adam Young & Joann Wilkie & Robert Ewing & Jyoti Rahman, 2008. "International comparison of industry productivity," Economic Roundup, The Treasury, Australian Government, issue 3, pages 45-61, October.
    5. Peter Hall & Robert Wylie, 2014. "Isolation and technological innovation," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 357-376, April.
    6. Aaron Drew, 2007. "New Zealand's productivity performance and prospects," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 70, March.
    7. Mark Obren & Bronwyn Howell, 2014. "The tyranny of distance prevails: HTTP protocol latency and returns to fast fibre internet access network deployment in remote economies," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(1), pages 65-85, January.
    8. Simon Condliffe & William Latham & Christian Le Bas & Frédéric Miribel, 2008. "Agglomeration Economies within IT-Producing and IT-Consuming Industries in U.S. Regions," Working Papers 08-24, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    9. Graeme Davis & Jyoti Rahman, 2006. "Perspectives on Australia's productivity prospects," Treasury Working Papers 2006-04, The Treasury, Australian Government, revised Sep 2006.

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This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.