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Chansung Kim

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First Name:Chansung
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Last Name:Kim
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RePEc Short-ID:pki51
1705 sw 11th ave Portland, OR, 97201
503) 471-7099

Research output

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Articles

  1. Kim, Chansung, 2008. "Commuting time stability: A test of a co-location hypothesis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 524-544, March.
  2. Chansung Kim & Chang Gyu Choi & Seongkil Cho & Daehyon Kim, 2008. "A comparative study of aggregate and disaggregate gravity models using Seoul metropolitan subway trip data," Transportation Planning and Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(1), pages 59-70, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Kim, Chansung, 2008. "Commuting time stability: A test of a co-location hypothesis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 524-544, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Parent & James P. Lesage, 2010. "A Spatial Dynamic Panel Model with Random Effects Applied to Commuting Times," University of Cincinnati, Economics Working Papers Series 2010-01, University of Cincinnati, Department of Economics.
    2. Rafael Henrique Moraes Pereira & Tim Schwanen, 2013. "Commute Time in Brazil (1992-2009): Differences Between Metropolitan Areas, by Income Levels and Gender," Discussion Papers 1813a, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    3. Sevcíková, Hana & Raftery, Adrian E. & Waddell, Paul A., 2011. "Uncertain benefits: Application of Bayesian melding to the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 540-553, July.
    4. Levinson, David & El-Geneidy, Ahmed, 2009. "The minimum circuity frontier and the journey to work," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 732-738, November.
    5. Tillema, Taede & van Wee, Bert & Ettema, Dick, 2010. "The influence of (toll-related) travel costs in residential location decisions of households: A stated choice approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 785-796, December.
    6. Gershenson, Seth, 2013. "The causal effect of commute time on labor supply: Evidence from a natural experiment involving substitute teachers," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 127-140.
    7. Alex Anas, 2015. "Why Are Urban Travel Times So Stable?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 230-261, March.
    8. Joly, I., 2011. "Test of the relation between travel and activities times : different representations of a demand derived from activity participation," Working Papers 201103, Grenoble Applied Economics Laboratory (GAEL).

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