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Do Deficits Matter?

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  • Shaviro, Daniel

Abstract

Do deficits matter? Yes and no, says Daniel Shaviro in this political and economic study. Yes, because fiscal policy affects generational distribution, national saving, and the level of government spending. And no, because the deficit is an inaccurate measure with little economic content. This book provides an invaluable guide for anyone wanting to know exactly what is at stake for Americans in this ongoing debate. "[An] excellent, comprehensive, and illuminating book. Its analysis, deftly integrating considerations of economics, law, politics, and philosophy, brings the issues of 'balanced budgets,' national saving, and intergenerational equity out of the area of religious crusades and into an arena of reason. . . . A magnificent, judicious, and balanced treatment. It should be read and studied not just by specialists in fiscal policy but by all those in the economic and political community."—Robert Eisner, Journal of Economic Literature "Shaviro's history, economics, and political analysis are right on the mark. For all readers."— Library Journal

Suggested Citation

  • Shaviro, Daniel, 1997. "Do Deficits Matter?," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226751122, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:bkecon:9780226751122
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    Cited by:

    1. David Bradford, 2001. "Reforming Budgetary Language," CESifo Working Paper Series 619, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Bernd Raffelhuschen & Laurence J. Kotlikoff, 1999. "Generational Accounting around the Globe," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 161-166, May.
    3. Dongwon Lee, 2016. "Supermajority rule and bicameral bargaining," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 169(1), pages 53-75, October.
    4. David F. Bradford & Daniel N. Shaviro, 1999. "The Economics of Vouchers," NBER Working Papers 7092, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Marc-Jean Martin, 2004. "A Theoretical Basis for the Consideration of Spending Thresholds in the Analysis of Fiscal Referendums," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 359-370, November.
    6. repec:pri:cepsud:74bradford is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Dongwon Lee, 2015. "Supermajority rule and the law of 1/n," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 164(3), pages 251-274, September.

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