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Surging Capital Flows To Emerging Asia: Facts, Impacts And Responses



    (International Monetary Fund, USA)



    (International Monetary Fund, USA)



    (International Monetary Fund, USA)



    (International Monetary Fund, USA)

Net capital flows to Emerging Asia rebounded at a record pace following the global financial crisis, raising concerns about overheating and financial stability. This paper documents the size and composition of the most recent surge to Asian emerging markets from a historical perspective and compares developments in the broader economy, asset prices, and corporate variables across the different episodes of strong inflows. We find little evidence of a significant build-up of imbalances and resource misallocation during the most recent surge. We also review country experiences in managing the risks associated with inflows and argue that Asian countries have used regulatory measures during past surges.

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Article provided by World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Commerce, Economics and Policy.

Volume (Year): 04 (2013)
Issue (Month): 02 ()
Pages: 1350007-1-1350007-24

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Handle: RePEc:wsi:jicepx:v:04:y:2013:i:02:p:1350007-1-1350007-24
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  1. Fernando Broner & Tatiana Didier & Aitor Erce & Sergio L. Schmukler, 2010. "Gross capital flows: Dynamics and crises," Economics Working Papers 1227, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Dec 2012.
  2. Mahvash S. Qureshi & Jonathan D. Ostry & Atish R. Ghosh & Marcos Chamon, 2011. "Managing Capital Inflows: The Role of Capital Controls and Prudential Policies," NBER Working Papers 17363, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Nicolas Magud & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2005. "Capital Controls: An Evaluation," University of Oregon Economics Department Working Papers 2005-19, University of Oregon Economics Department.
    • Nicolas Magud & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2007. "Capital Controls: An Evaluation," NBER Chapters, in: Capital Controls and Capital Flows in Emerging Economies: Policies, Practices and Consequences, pages 645-674 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Selim Elekdag & Yiqun Wu, 2011. "Rapid Credit Growth: Boon or Boom-Bust?," IMF Working Papers 11/241, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Mahmood Pradhan & Ravi Balakrishnan & Reza Baqir & Geoffrey Heenan & Sylwia Nowak & Ceyda Oner & Sanjaya Panth, 2011. "Policy Responses to Capital Flows in Emerging Markets," IMF Staff Discussion Notes 11/10, International Monetary Fund.
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