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Contraception And Development: A Unified Growth Theory

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  • Holger Strulik

Abstract

This study investigates the interaction of the use of modern contraceptives, fertility, education, and long‐run growth. It develops an economic model that takes into account that sexual intercourse is utility enhancing and that birth control by modern contraceptives is more efficient but more costly than traditional methods. The study shows how a traditional economy, in which modern contraceptives are not used, gradually converges toward a high growth regime, in which modern contraceptives are used. Lower prices or higher efficacy of contraceptives are conducive to an earlier onset of the fertility transition and a quicker takeoff to modern growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Holger Strulik, 2017. "Contraception And Development: A Unified Growth Theory," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 58, pages 561-584, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:iecrev:v:58:y:2017:i::p:561-584
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/iere.12227
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hippolyte D'Albis & Angela Greulich & Grégory Ponthière, 2015. "AVOIR UN ENFANT PLUS TARD Enjeux sociodémographiques du report des naissances," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01298929, HAL.
    2. repec:hal:journl:hal-01298929 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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