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Pooling international health care expenditure data

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  • Ulf‐G. Gerdtham

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is twofold. The first is to analyse the statistical relationship between real health care expenditure per capita and aggregate income, public share in finance, age‐dependency ratio and inflation. The second purpose deals with methodological problems involved in pooling health care expenditure data. The empirical work is based on pooled cross‐sectional, time‐series data for 22 OECD countries from 1972 to 1987. Public finance share and inflation were found to be associated with lower per capita health care expenditure. No consistent correlation was found between the age‐dependency ratio and health care expenditure. Contrary to results of earlier studies, we found that health care expenditure does not appear to be income (GDP) elastic. However, the results do not appear to be robust to changes in the time periods and countries included.

Suggested Citation

  • Ulf‐G. Gerdtham, 1992. "Pooling international health care expenditure data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(4), pages 217-231, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:1:y:1992:i:4:p:217-231
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    Cited by:

    1. Masayoshi Hayashi & Akiko Oyama, "undated". "Factor decomposition of inter-prefectural health care expenditure disparities in Japan," Discussion papers ron264, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan.
    2. Hartwig, Jochen, 2008. "What drives health care expenditure?--Baumol's model of 'unbalanced growth' revisited," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 603-623, May.
    3. Helmut Herwartz & Bernd Theilen, 2003. "The determinants of health care expenditure: testing pooling restrictions in small samples," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(2), pages 113-124.
    4. Erkan Erdil & I. Hakan Yetkiner, 2009. "The Granger-causality between health care expenditure and output: a panel data approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(4), pages 511-518.
    5. repec:wfo:wstudy:46672 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Löthgren, Mickael, 1998. "International Health Expenditure and GDP: New Multivariate Cointegration Panel Data Results," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 258, Stockholm School of Economics.
    7. Seher Sülkü & Asena Caner, 2011. "Health care expenditures and gross domestic product: the Turkish case," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 12(1), pages 29-38, February.
    8. Joan Costa-Font & Marin Gemmill & Gloria Rubert, 2008. "Re-visiting the Health Care Luxury Good Hypothesis: Aggregation, Precision, and Publication Biases?," Working Papers in Economics 197, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    9. Maria da Conceição Sampaio e Sousa, 2011. "Locally Provided Public Schooling in Brazilian Municipalities," Economia, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics], vol. 12(3), pages 427-444.
    10. M. -Y. Chen & F. -L. Lin & C. -K. Chang, 2009. "Relations between health care expenditure and income: an application of local quantile regressions," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 177-181.
    11. Auerbach, Alan J. & Chun, Young Jun, 2006. "Generational accounting in Korea," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 234-268, June.
    12. Giorgia Marini, 2016. "A note on the power of panel cointegration tests – An application to health care expenditure and gdp," Public Finance Research Papers 21, Istituto di Economia e Finanza, DIGEF, Sapienza University of Rome.
    13. Jochen Hartwig & Jan-Egbert Sturm, 2014. "Robust determinants of health care expenditure growth," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(36), pages 4455-4474, December.
    14. Helmut Herwartz & Bernd Theilen, 2014. "Health Care And Ideology: A Reconsideration Of Political Determinants Of Public Healthcare Funding In The Oecd," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(2), pages 225-240, February.

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