IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

The EU Financial Transactions Tax: Antecedents and Current Debate


  • Yiannis Kitromilides

    () (Centre for International Business and Sustainability, London Metropolitan University, UK)

  • Ana Rosa González

    () (Department of Applied Economics V, University of the Basque Country, Spain)


The paper deals with the development of the Financial Transactions Tax (FTT) policy idea and its feasibility in the absence of global coordination. New taxes are evaluated in terms of how they fit into existing national tax systems. Increasingly, however, cross-border issues assume greater significance in tax design and this is particularly pertinent in the case of FTT which has a long history. The various changes in tax systems and the economic environments within which they operate since the original “Tobin Tax†proposal are noted and the way they affect the debate on FTT are discussed. The proposal to introduce a unilateral FTT in the EU and its feasibility are examined. In terms of achieving its fundamental objectives the feasibility of the tax is crucial unless, as may be the case in the UK, the need to rebalance the economy away from the financial sector is a more urgent priority.

Suggested Citation

  • Yiannis Kitromilides & Ana Rosa González, 2013. "The EU Financial Transactions Tax: Antecedents and Current Debate," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 60(3), pages 311-321, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:voj:journl:v:60:y:2013:i:3:p:311-321

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John Brondolo, 2011. "Taxing Financial Transactions; An Assessment of Administrative Feasibility," IMF Working Papers 11/185, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Rafal Raciborski & Julia Lendvai & Lukas Vogel, 2012. "Securities Transaction Taxes: Macroeconomic Implications in a General-Equilibrium Model," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 450, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    3. Summers, L.H. & Summers, V.P., 1989. "When Financial Markets Work Too Well : A Cautious Case For A Securities Transactions Tax," Papers t12, Columbia - Center for Futures Markets.
    4. Thornton Matheson, 2011. "Taxing Financial Transactions; Issues and Evidence," IMF Working Papers 11/54, International Monetary Fund.
    5. James Tobin, 1978. "A Proposal for International Monetary Reform," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 4(3-4), pages 153-159, Jul/Oct.
    6. European Commission, 2013. "Taxation trends in the European Union: 2013 edition," Taxation trends 2013, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    7. European Commission, 2007. "Taxation trends in the European Union: 2007 edition," Taxation trends 2007, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    8. European Commission, 2012. "Taxation trends in the European Union: 2012 edition," Taxation trends 2012, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    9. John Y. Campbell & Kenneth A. Froot, 1994. "International Experiences with Securities Transaction Taxes," NBER Chapters,in: The Internationalization of Equity Markets, pages 277-308 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Phillip Anthony O’Hara, 2011. "International Subprime Crisis and Recession: Emerging Macroprudential, Monetary, Fiscal and Global Governance," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 58(1), pages 1-17, March.
    11. Diamond, Peter A & Mirrlees, James A, 1971. "Optimal Taxation and Public Production II: Tax Rules," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(3), pages 261-278, June.
    12. Arestis, Philip & Sawyer, Malcolm, 1997. "How Many Cheers for the Tobin Transactions Tax?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(6), pages 753-768, November.
    13. John Grahl, 2003. "Sand in the wheels or spanner in the works? The Tobin tax and global finance," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(4), pages 597-621, July.
    14. European Commission, 2009. "Taxation trends in the European Union: 2009 edition," Taxation trends 2009, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    15. European Commission, 2011. "Taxation trends in the European Union: 2011 edition," Taxation trends 2011, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ecmode:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:322-333 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Gaffeo, Edoardo & Molinari, Massimo, 2017. "Taxing financial transactions in fundamentally heterogeneous markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 322-333.
    3. Luigi Bonatti & Lorenza Lorenzetti, 2016. "The co-evolution of tax evasion, social capital and policy responses: A theoretical approach," DEM Working Papers 2016/08, Department of Economics and Management.

    More about this item


    Financial transactions tax; Tobin tax; Computerised financial trading; Global tax coordination;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:voj:journl:v:60:y:2013:i:3:p:311-321. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ivana Horvat). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.