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Knowledge and Job Opportunities in a Gender Perspective: Insights from Italy

  • Angela Cipollone


    (LUISS G. Carli, Italy)

  • Marcella Corsi


    (Sapienza University of Rome, Italy)

  • Carlo D’Ippoliti


    (Sapienza University of Rome, Italy)

The paper proposes an enlargement of the traditional notion of human capital, by conceptualising knowledge in a comprehensive and multidimensional way. In our empirical approach, knowledge encompasses several formal and informal skills, to complement the mainstream view narrowly concerned with education and on-the-job training. Our results for Italy point out that despite much rhetoric about the reduction (or even the reversal) of gender gaps in education, women often lack the main skills and competencies that can profitably be deployed in the labour market. Unsurprisingly, in Italy women’s accumulation of labour market experience is mostly hindered by unpaid housework burdens. However, when adopting an extensive definition of knowledge these activities may be regarded as a source of relevant knowledge. Yet, they do not seem to be positively valued by the market, either in terms of employability or in terms of wages, thus calling for a serious rethinking of the role of knowledge in shaping men’s and women’s economic opportunities

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Article provided by Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia in its journal Panoeconomicus.

Volume (Year): 58 (2011)
Issue (Month): 5 (December)
Pages: 735-757

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Handle: RePEc:voj:journl:v:58:y:2011:i:5:p:735-757
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  1. Marcella Corsi & Fabrizio Botti & Tommaso Rondinella & Giulia Zacchia, 2006. "Women and Microfinance in Mediterranean Countries," Development, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 49(2), pages 67-74, June.
  2. Annamaria Lusardi, 2006. "Planning and Financial Literacy: How Do Women Fare?," Working Papers wp136, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  3. Romer, Paul M., 1990. "Human capital and growth: Theory and evidence," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 251-286, January.
  4. Angela Cipollone & Carlo D'Ippoliti, 2009. "Women's Employment: Beyond Individual Characteristics vs. Contextual Factors Explanations," Working Papers CELEG 0901, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
  5. M. Anne Hill & Elizabeth King, 1995. "Women's education and economic well-being," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 21-46.
  6. Marcella Corsi & Manuela Samek Lodovici, 2013. "Active Ageing and Gender Equality," Working Papers CEB 13-004, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  7. David Colander & Joanna Wayland Woos, 1997. "Institutional Demand-Side Discrimination Against Women and the Human Capital Model," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 53-64.
  8. D’Ippoliti, Carlo, 2011. "Economics And Diversity," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 33(04), pages 562-564, December.
  9. Claudia Biancotti & Giovanni D'Alessio & Andrea Neri, 2004. "Errori di misura nell�indagine sui bilanci delle famiglie italiane," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 520, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  10. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Angela Cipollone & Carlo D'Ippoliti, 2010. "Discriminating factors of women's employment," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(11), pages 1055-1062.
  12. Richard Blundell, 1992. "Labour supply and taxation: a survey," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 13(3), pages 15-40, January.
  13. Luc SOETE, 2001. "ICTs, knowledge work and employment: The challenges to Europe," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 140(2), pages 143-163, 06.
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