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Labour migration in the enlarged EU: a new economic geography approach

  • d'Artis Kancs

This paper studies the impact of migration policy liberalisation on international labour migration in the enlarged European Union (EU) in a structural economic geography approach. The liberalisation of migration policy would induce an additional 1.80-2.98% of the total EU workforce to change their country of location, with most of migrant workers relocating from the East to the West. The average net migration rate is decreasing in the level of integration, suggesting that from an economic point of view no regulatory policy responses are necessary to labour migration in the enlarged EU.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17487870.2011.577648
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Economic Policy Reform.

Volume (Year): 14 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 171-188

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jpolrf:v:14:y:2011:i:2:p:171-188
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  1. Dries, Liesbeth & Ciaian, Pavel & Kancs, d'Artis, 2011. "Job Creation And Job Destruction In The Eu Agriculture," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114430, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
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