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The impact of trust on reforms

  • Friedrich Heinemann
  • Benjamin Tanz

In a constantly changing economic environment, a country's ability to undertake institutional reforms is crucial to maintain economic growth and to promote the welfare of its citizens. A wide range of determinants for institutional reforms have been identified. However, the impact of trust on reforms has not been fully addressed. We provide theoretical arguments why trust should influence institutional changes and test the relationship empirically. We find a significant positive relation between trust and the success of reforms with regard to government size, the legal system, and deregulation of private businesses and the labor market. Other policy fields are ambiguous.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Economic Policy Reform.

Volume (Year): 11 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 173-185

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jpolrf:v:11:y:2008:i:3:p:173-185
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