IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Market Concepts, Coordination Mechanisms and New Actors in Social Housing

  • Mary Lee Rhodes
  • David Mullins
Registered author(s):

    This introduction to the special issue on 'market concepts, coordination mechanisms and new actors in social housing' makes the case for multi-disciplinary and multi-level studies of the impacts of market-oriented policies aimed at social housing. The authors suggest that privatisation, tenant purchase programmes, market oriented policy shifts, increased regulation, changing household needs and lingering problems with stigmatisation have combined to create a challenging operating environment for social housing providers and that the phenomenon of 'marketisation' of social housing has four distinct strands. These are: 1) problematising, 2) bypassing, 3) replacing and 4) transforming social housing, and the focus of the articles in the special issue is on the fourth strand. Transforming social housing encompasses policies aimed at increasing the interaction between social and private housing providers, encouraging managerialist approaches to housing provision and introducing regulations and/or incentives to increase competition among social housing providers as well as between social and private landlords. The editorial concludes with suggested directions for research into the marketisation of social housing and recommends that researchers continue to pursue the connections that can be made among different disciplines in the study of organisational change in this sector.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/14616710902920199&magic=repec&7C&7C8674ECAB8BB840C6AD35DC6213A474B5
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal International Journal of Housing Policy.

    Volume (Year): 9 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 107-119

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:taf:intjhp:v:9:y:2009:i:2:p:107-119
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/REUJ20

    Order Information: Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/REUJ20

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:intjhp:v:9:y:2009:i:2:p:107-119. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.