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On central bank interventions and transaction taxes


  • Frank H. Westerhoff


We show that carefully designed central bank interventions may have a similar (stabilizing) effect on foreign exchange dynamics as transaction taxes. Transaction taxes seek to curb speculative activity. If speculators consist of chartists and fundamentalists  --  as indicated by many empirical studies  --  central banks may seek to replicate the impact of transaction taxes by countering the orders of these traders. This would simultaneously require trading against the current exchange rate trend and, surprisingly, slowing down the convergence of the exchange rate towards its fundamental value.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank H. Westerhoff, 2007. "On central bank interventions and transaction taxes," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 11-14, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfelt:v:3:y:2007:i:1:p:11-14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Garber, Peter & Taylor, Mark P, 1995. "Sand in the Wheels of Foreign Exchange Markets: A Sceptical Note," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(428), pages 173-180, January.
    2. Christopher J. Neely, 2001. "The practice of central bank intervention: looking under the hood," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 1-10.
    3. James Tobin, 1978. "A Proposal for International Monetary Reform," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 4(3-4), pages 153-159, Jul/Oct.
    4. Rosser, J. Jr. & Ahmed, Ehsan & Hartmann, Georg C., 2003. "Volatility via social flaring," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 77-87, January.
    5. Westerhoff, Frank H. & Dieci, Roberto, 2006. "The effectiveness of Keynes-Tobin transaction taxes when heterogeneous agents can trade in different markets: A behavioral finance approach," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 293-322, February.
    6. Mark P. Taylor & Lucio Sarno, 2001. "Official Intervention in the Foreign Exchange Market: Is It Effective and, If So, How Does It Work?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 839-868, September.
    7. Mark P. Taylor, 2004. "Is Official Exchange Rate Intervention Effective?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71, pages 1-11, February.
    8. Taylor, Mark P. & Allen, Helen, 1992. "The use of technical analysis in the foreign exchange market," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 304-314, June.
    9. Brock, William A. & Hommes, Cars H., 1998. "Heterogeneous beliefs and routes to chaos in a simple asset pricing model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(8-9), pages 1235-1274, August.
    10. Lux, T. & M. Marchesi, "undated". "Volatility Clustering in Financial Markets: A Micro-Simulation of Interacting Agents," Discussion Paper Serie B 437, University of Bonn, Germany, revised Jul 1998.
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