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The Evolutionary Dynamics of Tolerance

  • Luca CORREANI

    ()

    (DISTATEQ, Tuscia University of Viterbo, Italy)

  • Fabio DI DIO

    ()

    (Department of Economics and Law, University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy)

  • Giuseppe GAROFALO

    ()

    (DISTATEQ, Tuscia University of Viterbo, Italy)

This paper incorporates the phenomenon of tolerance into an economic analysis, showing how different attitudes to trust and cooperation can affect economic outcomes. In the economic system we propose, tolerance is associated with the different weight that agents attribute to their own nature and to the institutional parameters in their utility function. We thus construct an overlapping generations model (OLG), showing that the incentives that influence descendants' predisposition to tolerance depend on both institutional factors, where behavior is imposed by rules, and on social (or cultural) factors, found in popular customs and established traditions. Our study highlights the absolute impossibility of affirming tolerance through formal rules. In fact, we show that intolerance emerges as persistent attitude (intolerance trap) and its control is only possible through constant and continuous interventions on the educational processes of new generations.

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Article provided by ASERS Publishing in its journal Theoretical and Practical Research in Economic Fields.

Volume (Year): I (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (December)
Pages: 219 - 231

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Handle: RePEc:srs:tpref1:6:v:1:y:2010:i:2:p:219-231
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  1. Hauk, Esther & Sáez-Martí, María, 2001. "On the Cultural Transmission of Corruption," Working Paper Series 564, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  2. Ira N. Gang & Gil S. Epstein, 2002. "Understanding the Development of Fundamentalism," Departmental Working Papers 200222, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  3. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics And Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753, August.
  4. Darity, William Jr. & Mason, Patrick L. & Stewart, James B., 2006. "The economics of identity: The origin and persistence of racial identity norms," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 283-305, July.
  5. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1997. "Toward an Economic Theory of "Fundamentalism"," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 153(1), pages 100-, March.
  6. Daniel G. Arce M. & Todd Sandler, 2003. "An Evolutionary Game Approach to Fundamentalism and Conflict," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 159(1), pages 132-, March.
  7. Bisin, Alberto & Verdier, Thierry, 1998. "On the cultural transmission of preferences for social status," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 75-97, October.
  8. Arce, Daniel G. & Sandler, Todd, 2009. "Fitting in: Group effects and the evolution of fundamentalism," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 739-757, September.
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