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The Good African Society Index

Listed author(s):
  • Ferdi Botha

    ()

    (Rhodes University)

Abstract This paper constructs a Good Society Index for 45 African countries, termed the Good African Society Index (GASI). The GASI consists of nine main indexes: (1) economic sustainability, (2) democracy and freedom, (3) child well-being, (4) environment and infrastructure, (5) safety and security, (6) health and health systems, (7) integrity and justice, (8) education, and (9) social sustainability and social cohesion. Each component is split into four sub-components for a total of 36 indicators. Tunisia ranks highest on the GASI, followed by Cape Verde and Botswana. Chad has the lowest GASI score, followed by Central African Republic and Cote d’Ivoire. The GASI is strongly related to the 2012 Human Development Index and Fragile States Index, to a lesser extent, GNI per capita.

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File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11205-015-0891-z
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

Volume (Year): 126 (2016)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 57-77

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Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:126:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-015-0891-z
DOI: 10.1007/s11205-015-0891-z
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