IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Vulnerability to the health effects of climate variability in rural southwestern Uganda

Listed author(s):
  • Jolène Labbé

    ()

    (McGill University)

  • James D Ford

    (McGill University)

  • Lea Berrang-Ford

    (McGill University)

  • Blanaid Donnelly

    (McGill University)

  • Shuaib Lwasa

    (Makerere University)

  • Didacus Bambaiha Namanya

    (Ministry of Health)

  • Sabastian Twesigomwe

    (Kellerman Foundation in Bwindi)

  • Sherilee L Harper

    (University of Guelph)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract Vulnerability to the health impacts of climate change will be shaped by the existing burden of ill- health and is expected to be highest in poor and socio-economically marginalized populations. Sub-Saharan Africa, in particular, is considered a highly vulnerable region. This paper analyses the vulnerability and adaptive capacity of rural Bakiga communities in southwestern Uganda to climate-sensitive health risks. The objectives were threefold: i) identify key climate-sensitive, community-identified health priorities; ii) describe and characterize determinants of sensitivity to these health priorities at the individual, community and regional levels; and iii) assess the adaptive capacity of Bakiga. Data collection employed a combination of individual and key informant interviews, biographies, future storylines, and Photovoice. Three key health risks were identified by the study communities (malaria, food insecurity, and gastrointestinal illnesses) – all affected by local climatic and environmental conditions, livelihoods, land use changes, and socio-economic conditions. Adaptation within these communities is dependent on their capacity to reduce sensitivities to identified health challenges among the potential of increasing exposures. Crop diversification, reducing deforestation, expanding of livestock rearing, transfer of traditional knowledge, and access to affordable health services are among potential strategies identified. We demonstrate significant existing vulnerabilities to present day climate-related health risks and highlight the importance of non-climatic processes and local conditions in creating sensitivity to health risks. Our place-based understanding is useful to inform interventions or policies aimed to reduce exposure and sensitivity and support adaptive capacity as the conditions these communities face are consistent with many other sub-Saharan African countries.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11027-015-9635-2
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2016)
    Issue (Month): 6 (August)
    Pages: 931-953

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:21:y:2016:i:6:d:10.1007_s11027-015-9635-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s11027-015-9635-2
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11027

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. I. Hofmeijer & J. Ford & L. Berrang-Ford & C. Zavaleta & C. Carcamo & E. Llanos & C. Carhuaz & V. Edge & S. Lwasa & D. Namanya, 2013. "Community vulnerability to the health effects of climate change among indigenous populations in the Peruvian Amazon: a case study from Panaillo and Nuevo Progreso," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 18(7), pages 957-978, October.
    2. Santosh, Kumar & Sebastian, Vollmer, 2011. "Does improved sanitation reduce diarrhea in children in rural India?," MPRA Paper 31804, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Berrang-Ford, Lea & Dingle, Kathryn & Ford, James D. & Lee, Celine & Lwasa, Shuaib & Namanya, Didas B. & Henderson, Jim & Llanos, Alejandro & Carcamo, Cesar & Edge, Victoria, 2012. "Vulnerability of indigenous health to climate change: A case study of Uganda's Batwa Pygmies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(6), pages 1067-1077.
    4. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2012. "The influence of price on school enrollment under Uganda's policy of free primary education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 799-811.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:21:y:2016:i:6:d:10.1007_s11027-015-9635-2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla)

    or (Rebekah McClure)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.