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Intersectoral burden sharing of CO2 mitigation in China in 2020

Listed author(s):
  • Weidong Chen

    (Tianjin University)

  • Qing He

    ()

    (Tianjin University)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract The aim of this paper is to provide a sector-based method for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions control and to disaggregate China’s national CO2 mitigation burden at the sectoral level. Based on a detailed analysis of three burden sharing indicators—responsibility, capacity, and efficiency—this paper derives a mitigation burden index to suggest which economic sectors should bear more (or less) mitigation burden. A multi criteria allocation model of sectoral CO2 intensity (CO2 per unit of added value) is then constructed to determine each sector’s mitigation target for 2020. The main findings are: (1) Allocation results based on multi criteria are more acceptable and practical than those based on only one criterion. (2) Policy maker preference for criteria has a significant effect on allocation results. (3) The fours sectors, manufacture of raw chemical materials and chemical products, manufacture of non-metallic mineral products, smelting and pressing of ferrous metals, and other services, consistently bear the highest mitigation burden. This paper offers policy makers a sector-based method to control CO2 emissions. Combining this method with sectoral potential for technological advancement and sectoral mitigation costs would produce a more feasible and cost effective burden sharing scheme.

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    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11027-014-9566-3
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2016)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 1-14

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:21:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s11027-014-9566-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s11027-014-9566-3
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11027

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