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Increasing inequality, consumer credit and financial fragility in an agent based macroeconomic model

Author

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  • Alberto Russo

    () (Università Politecnica delle Marche)

  • Luca Riccetti

    (Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • Mauro Gallegati

    (Università Politecnica delle Marche)

Abstract

Abstract We investigate the interplay between increasing inequality and consumer credit in a complex macroeconomic system with financially fragile heterogeneous households, firms and banks. Simulation results show that there are pros and cons of introducing consumer credit: on the one hand, for a certain time, it leads to lower unemployment through boosting aggregate demand; on the other hand, it accelerates the system tendency to the crisis. Since the increase of financial profits goes with a decline of households’ real wealth, a policy trade-off emerges.

Suggested Citation

  • Alberto Russo & Luca Riccetti & Mauro Gallegati, 2016. "Increasing inequality, consumer credit and financial fragility in an agent based macroeconomic model," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 25-47, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:26:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s00191-015-0410-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-015-0410-z
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    Cited by:

    1. Elisa Palagi & Mauro Napoletano & Andrea Roventini & Jean-Luc Gaffard, 2017. "Inequality, Redistributive Policies and Multiplier Dynamics in an Agent-based Model with Credit Rationing," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 3(3), pages 367-387, November.
    2. Dosi, G. & Pereira, M.C. & Roventini, A. & Virgillito, M.E., 2017. "When more flexibility yields more fragility: The microfoundations of Keynesian aggregate unemployment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 162-186.
    3. Giovanni Dosi & Marcelo C. Pereira & Andrea Roventini & Maria Enrica Virgillito, 2018. "What if supply-side policies are not enough? The perverse interaction of flexibility and austerity," LEM Papers Series 2018/01, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    4. Eugenio Caverzasi & Alberto Russo, 2018. "Toward a new microfounded macroeconomics in the wake of the crisis," Working Papers PKWP1807, Post Keynesian Economics Society (PKES).
    5. Alberto Cardaci & Francesco Saraceno, 2017. "Inequality and Imbalances : a Monetary Union Agent-Based Model," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2017-30, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    6. Zakaria Babutsidze & Maurizio Iacopetta, 2016. "Innovation, growth and financial markets," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 1-24, March.
    7. Dawid, H. & Harting, P. & Neugart, M., 2018. "Cohesion policy and inequality dynamics: Insights from a heterogeneous agents macroeconomic model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 220-255.
    8. repec:spr:italej:v:3:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s40797-017-0060-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Tommaso Ciarli & Andre Lorentz & Marco Valente & Maria Savona, 2017. "Structural Changes and Growth Regime," Working Papers of BETA 2017-19, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    10. Giorgio Fagiolo & Andrea Roventini, 2017. "Macroeconomic Policy in DSGE and Agent-Based Models Redux: New Developments and Challenges Ahead," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 20(1), pages 1-1.
    11. repec:eee:jeborg:v:149:y:2018:i:c:p:434-458 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Alberto CARDACI & Francesco SARACENO, 2015. "Inequality, Financialisation and Economic Crises: An Agent-Based Macro Model," Departmental Working Papers 2015-21, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    13. Giovanni Dosi & Marcelo C. Pereira & Andrea Roventini & Maria Enrica Virgillito, 2017. "Causes and Consequences of Hysteresis: Aggregate Demand, Productivity and Employment," LEM Papers Series 2017/07, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    14. Safarzyńska, Karolina & van den Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M., 2017. "Integrated crisis-energy policy: Macro-evolutionary modelling of technology, finance and energy interactions," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 119-137.
    15. Ponta, Linda & Raberto, Marco & Teglio, Andrea & Cincotti, Silvano, 2018. "An Agent-based Stock-flow Consistent Model of the Sustainable Transition in the Energy Sector," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 274-300.
    16. Alberto Cardaci & Francesco Saraceno, 2015. "Inequality, Financialisation and Economic Crisis : an Agent-Based Model," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-27, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    17. Caiani, Alessandro & Russo, Alberto & Gallegati, Mauro, 2016. "Does Inequality Hamper Innovation and Growth?," MPRA Paper 71864, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Cardaci, Alberto & Saraceno, Francesco, 2016. "Inequality, Financialisation and Credit Booms - a Model of Two Crises," SEP Working Papers 2016/2, LUISS School of European Political Economy.
    19. Giovanni Dosi & Andrea Roventini, 2017. "Agent-Based Macroeconomics and Classical Political Economy: Some Italian Roots," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 3(3), pages 261-283, November.
    20. Marco Raberto & Bulent Ozel & Linda Ponta & Andrea Teglio & Silvano Cincotti, 2016. "From financial instability to green finance: the role of banking and monetary policies in the Eurace model," Working Papers 2016/07, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    21. Caiani, Alessandro & Russo, Alberto & Gallegati, Mauro, 2017. "Are higher wages good for business? An assessment under alternative innovation and investment scenarios," MPRA Paper 80439, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. repec:eee:phsmap:v:493:y:2018:i:c:p:203-209 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Alberto Russo, 2017. "An Agent Based Macroeconomic Model with Social Classes and Endogenous Crises," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 3(3), pages 285-306, November.
    24. Robert Jump, 2016. "Evolutionary learning and the stability of wage posting equilibria," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(5), pages 1117-1135, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer credit; Inequality; Agent-based macroeconomics; Business cycle; Profit rate; Crisis; Unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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