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Freedom and gross in-migration: an empirical study of the post-great recession experience

Author

Listed:
  • Richard J. Cebula

    () (Jacksonville University)

  • Maggie Foley

    () (Jacksonville University)

  • Joshua C. Hall

    () (West Virginia University)

Abstract

Abstract Determinants of migration, including policy variables such as tax rates, have been extensively studied by regional scientists over the past several decades. The development of the Economic Freedom of North America Index has allowed researchers to test the relationship between migration patterns and economic freedom, with recent studies finding that net in-migration is positively related to economic freedom. Using a new cross-section measure of economic and personal freedom at the state level, we investigate the relationship between gross in-migration and economic freedom on the one hand and then between gross in-migration and total freedom on the other hand. This empirical study of domestic U.S. migration during the post-Great Recession period finds clear evidence that migrants prefer to move to those states affording higher levels of economic freedom and higher levels of total freedom.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard J. Cebula & Maggie Foley & Joshua C. Hall, 2016. "Freedom and gross in-migration: an empirical study of the post-great recession experience," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(2), pages 402-420, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jecfin:v:40:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s12197-014-9315-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s12197-014-9315-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Joshua C. Hall & Donald J. Lacombe & Timothy M. Shaughnessy, 2015. "Economic Freedom and Economic Growth Across U.S. States: A Spatial Panel Data Analysis," Working Papers 15-33, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    2. Joshua C. Hall, 2016. "Institutional convergence: exit or voice?," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 40(4), pages 829-840, October.
    3. Joshua C. Hall, 2017. "A "Model" Model: McCloskey and the Craft of Economics," Working Papers 17-09, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    4. Daniel Meierrieks & Laura Renner, 2017. "Stymied ambition: does a lack of economic freedom lead to migration?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(3), pages 977-1005, July.
    5. Crosby, Andrew W. & Merriman, David F., 2016. "What Happened to Illinois’ Economy Following the January 2011 Tax Increases? A Midwestern Comparison," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 46(1).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gross state in-migration; Economic freedom; Total freedom;

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • P14 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Property Rights
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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