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Interpreting Wage Gaps of Disabled Men: The Roles of Productivity and of Discrimination


  • Simonetta Longhi

    (Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3 SQ, United Kingdom)

  • Cheti Nicoletti

    () (Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3 SQ, United Kingdom)

  • Lucinda Platt

    (‡entre for Longitudinal Studies, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WCIH 0AL, United Kingdom)


Using the UK Labour Force Survey, we study wage gaps for disabled men after the introduction of the Disability Discrimination Act. We estimate wage gaps at the mean and at different quantiles of the wage distribution and decompose them into a part explained by differences in workers' and job characteristics, a part that can be ascribed to health-related reduced productivity, and a residual part. The large original wage gaps reduce substantially when we control for differences in education and occupation, although significant residuals remain. However, when we isolate productivity differences between disabled and nondisabled workers, the residual wage gap becomes insignificant in most cases.

Suggested Citation

  • Simonetta Longhi & Cheti Nicoletti & Lucinda Platt, 2012. "Interpreting Wage Gaps of Disabled Men: The Roles of Productivity and of Discrimination," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 931-953, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:78:3:y:2012:p:931-953

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    Cited by:

    1. Jones, Melanie K. & Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Sloane, Peter J. & Wei, Zhang, 2015. "The Dynamic Effect of Disability on Work and Subjective Wellbeing in Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 9609, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Melanie K. Jones, 2016. "Disability and Perceptions of Work and Management," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 54(1), pages 83-113, March.
    3. repec:mpr:mprres:341e1dba100a4d988613006cb2957100 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:mpr:mprres:8112 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Igei, Kengo, 2017. "Untangling Disability and Poverty: A Matching Approach Using Large-scale Data in South Africa," Working Papers 142, JICA Research Institute.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models


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