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The Relationship between Suicidal Behavior and Productive Activities of Young Adults

Author

Listed:
  • Erdal Tekin

    () (Department of Economics, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 3992, Atlanta, GA 30302-3992, USA)

  • Sara Markowitz

    () (Department of Economics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322-2240, USA)

Abstract

This paper provides an analysis of the link between suicidal behaviors and human capital formation of young adults in the United States. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the effects of suicide thoughts and attempts on the probability of engaging in work or attending school. The richness of the data set allows us to implement several strategies to control for unobserved heterogeneity and the potential reverse causality. These strategies include using a large set of control variables that are likely to be correlated with both suicidal behavior and the outcome measures, an instrumental variables method, and fixed effects analyses from the subsamples of twin and sibling pairs. Results from the different identification strategies consistently indicate that both suicide thoughts and suicide attempts decrease the likelihood that a young adult individual engages in work or schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Erdal Tekin & Sara Markowitz, 2008. "The Relationship between Suicidal Behavior and Productive Activities of Young Adults," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 300-331, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:75:2:y:2008:p:300-331
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy Brezina & Erdal Tekin & Volkan Topalli, 2008. ""Might Not Be a Tomorrow": A Multi-Methods Approach to Anticipated Early Death and Youth Crime," NBER Working Papers 14279, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ferdi Botha, 2012. "The Economics Of Suicide In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 80(4), pages 526-552, December.
    3. Aliaksandr Amialchuk & Kateryna Bornukova & Mir M. Ali, 2012. "Smoking and Obesity Revisited: Evidence from Belarus," BEROC Working Paper Series 19, Belarusian Economic Research and Outreach Center (BEROC).
    4. Janet Currie & Erdal Tekin, 2012. "Understanding the Cycle: Childhood Maltreatment and Future Crime," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, pages 509-549.
    5. Fang, Hai & Ali, Mir M. & Rizzo, John A., 2009. "Does smoking affect body weight and obesity in China?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 334-350.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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