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Determinants of Government Aid to Katrina Survivors: Evidence from Survey Data

Author

Listed:
  • William F. Chappell

    () (Department of Economics, University of Mississippi)

  • Richard G. Forgette

    () (Department of Political Science, University of Mississippi)

  • David A. Swanson

    () (Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Mississippi)

  • Mark V. Van Boening

    () (Department of Economics, University of Mississippi)

Abstract

We analyze survey data from Mississippi coastal communities where Katrina made its final landfall. Logistic regressions indicate that government aid is helpful in dealing with one- to two-month economic disruption and long-term rebuilding but is less helpful with regard to short-term rebuilding and mitigating longer-term disruption. Our analysis (including a basic risk assessment) finds evidence that individuals receiving government aid and/or having a disability predisaster are likely to incur severe economic hardship postdisaster and that individuals with greater predisaster economic and/or social network capital seem to be less at risk. Our results underscore the importance of housing in the resumption of basic economic activity.

Suggested Citation

  • William F. Chappell & Richard G. Forgette & David A. Swanson & Mark V. Van Boening, 2007. "Determinants of Government Aid to Katrina Survivors: Evidence from Survey Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 344-362, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:74:1:y:2007:p:344-362
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:revaec:v:30:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11138-016-0369-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eiji Yamamura, 2010. "Effects of Interactions among Social Capital, Income and Learning from Experiences of Natural Disasters: A Case Study from Japan," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(8), pages 1019-1032.
    3. Edward P. Stringham & Nicholas A. Snow, 2008. "The broken trailer fallacy: Seeing the unseen effects of government policies in post-Katrina New Orleans," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(7), pages 480-489, June.
    4. Russell S. Sobel & Christopher Coyne & Peter Leeson, 2009. "The Political Economy of FEMA: Did Reorganization Matter?," Working Papers 09-10, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    5. yamamura, eiji, 2008. "Learning Effect And Social Capital: A Case Study Of Natural Disaster From Japan," MPRA Paper 10249, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Ewing Bradley T. & Kruse Jamie Brown & Sutter Daniel, 2009. "An Overview of Hurricane Katrina and Economic Loss," Journal of Business Valuation and Economic Loss Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 1-14, April.
    7. Yanochik Mark A. & Kumazawa Risa, 2009. "Interest Rate Manipulation, Environmental Damage, and Loss Valuation," Journal of Business Valuation and Economic Loss Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 1-14, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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