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Atypical Work and Pay

Author

Listed:
  • John T. Addison

    () (Department of Economics, Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina)

  • Christopher J. Surfield

    () (Department of Economics, College of Business and Management, Saginaw Valley State University)

Abstract

Atypical work has long been criticized in popular debate as providing poorly compensated, precarious employment. Yet the empirical evidence is both incomplete and mixed. The main contribution of the present paper is to estimate wage differences for the full set of these alternative work arrangements while simultaneously controlling for observed demographic characteristics and unobserved person-specific fixed effects. The paper also allows for the skewness in atypical worker earnings while retaining the Mincerian human capital earnings function. Our improved estimates are consistent with some of the more optimistic findings reported in the literature, the caveat being that we are examining here only the wage component of the total compensation package.

Suggested Citation

  • John T. Addison & Christopher J. Surfield, 2007. "Atypical Work and Pay," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 1038-1065, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:73:4:y:2007:p:1038-1065
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniëlle Bertrand-Cloodt & Frank Cörvers & Ben Kriechel & Jesper Thor, 2012. "Why Do Recent Graduates Enter into Flexible Jobs?," De Economist, Springer, vol. 160(2), pages 157-175, June.
    2. John T. Addison & Christopher J. Surfield, 2008. "Atypical Work and Employment Continuity," Working Paper series 12_08, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, revised Jan 2008.
    3. repec:eso:journl:v:48:y:2017:i:4:p:463-488 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. John T. Addison & Chad Cotti & Christopher J. Surfieldy, 2009. "Atypical Work: Who Gets It, and Where Does It Lead? Some U.S. Evidence Using the NLSY79," GEMF Working Papers 2009-12, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    5. Surfield, Christopher & Welch, William, 2009. "Atypical Work and Employment Regulations: A Comparison of Right-to-Work to Closed-Shop States," MPRA Paper 14462, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. John T. Addison & Chad D. Cotti & Christopher J. Surfield, 2015. "Atypical Jobs: Stepping Stones or Dead Ends? Evidence from the NLSY79," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(1), pages 17-55, January.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J40 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - General

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